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Showing all posts tagged waste-

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0146
Commits:
08bc188...456b621
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528, -Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th05+ tcc+ animation+ boss+ shinki+ micro-optimization+ waste- uth05win+

Y'know, I kinda prefer the pending crowdfunded workload to stay more near the middle of the cap, rather than being sold out all the time. So to reach this point more quickly, let's do the most relaxing thing that can be easily done in TH05 right now: The boss backgrounds, starting with Shinki's, 📝 now that we've got the time to look at it in detail.

… Oh come on, more things that are borderline undecompilable, and require new workarounds to be developed? Yup, Borland C++ always optimizes any comparison of a register with a literal 0 to OR reg, reg, no matter how many calculations and inlined function calls you replace the 0 with. Shinki's background particle rendering function contains a CMP AX, 0 instruction though… so yeah, 📝 yet another piece of custom ASM that's worse than what Turbo C++ 4.0J would have generated if ZUN had just written readable C. This was probably motivated by ZUN insisting that his modified master.lib function for blitting particles takes its X and Y parameters as registers. If he had just used the __fastcall convention, he also would have got the sprite ID passed as a register. 🤷
So, we really don't want to be forced into inline assembly just because of the third comparison in the otherwise perfectly decompilable four-comparison if() expression that prevents invisible particles from being drawn. The workaround: Comparing to a pointer instead, which only the linker gets to resolve to the actual value of 0. :tannedcirno: This way, the compiler has to make room for any 16-bit literal, and can't optimize anything.


And then we go straight from micro-optimization to waste, with all the duplication in the code that animates all those particles together with the zooming and spinning lines. This push decompiled 1.31% of all code in TH05, and thanks to alignment, we're still missing Shinki's high-level background rendering function that calls all the subfunctions I decompiled here.
With all the manipulated state involved here, it's not at all trivial to see how this code produces what you see in-game. Like:

  1. If all lines have the same Y velocity, how do the other three lines in background type B get pushed down into this vertical formation while the top one stays still? (Answer: This velocity is only applied to the top line, the other lines are only pushed based on some delta.)
  2. How can this delta be calculated based on the distance of the top line with its supposed target point around Shinki's wings? (Answer: The velocity is never set to 0, so the top line overshoots this target point in every frame. After calculating the delta, the top line itself is pushed down as well, canceling out the movement. :zunpet:)
  3. Why don't they get pushed down infinitely, but stop eventually? (Answer: We only see four lines out of 20, at indices #0, #6, #12, and #18. In each frame, lines [0..17] are copied to lines [1..18], before anything gets moved. The invisible lines are pushed down based on the delta as well, which defines a distance between the visible lines of (velocity * array gap). And since the velocity is capped at -14 pixels per frame, this also means a maximum distance of 84 pixels between the midpoints of each line.)
  4. And why are the lines moving back up when switching to background type C, before moving down? (Answer: Because type C increases the velocity rather than decreasing it. Therefore, it relies on the previous velocity state from type B to show a gapless animation.)
So yeah, it's a nice-looking effect, just very hard to understand. 😵

With the amount of effort I'm putting into this project, I typically gravitate towards more descriptive function names. Here, however, uth05win's simple and seemingly tiny-brained "background type A/B/C/D" was quite a smart choice. It clearly defines the sequence in which these animations are intended to be shown, and as we've seen with point 4 from the list above, that does indeed matter.

Next up: At least EX-Alice's background animations, and probably also the high-level parts of the background rendering for all the other TH05 bosses.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0138
Commits:
8d953dc...864e864
💰 Funded by:
[Anonymous], Blue Bolt
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ th02+ th03+ th04+ micro-optimization+ file-format+ waste-

Technical debt, part 9… and as it turns out, it's highly impractical to repay 100% of it at this point in development. 😕

The reason: graph_putsa_fx(), ZUN's function for rendering optionally boldfaced text to VRAM using the font ROM glyphs, in its ridiculously micro-optimized TH04 and TH05 version. This one sets the "callback function" for applying the boldface effect by self-modifying the target of two CALL rel16 instructions… because there really wasn't any free register left for an indirect CALL, eh? The necessary distance, from the call site to the function itself, has to be calculated at assembly time, by subtracting the target function label from the call site label.
This usually wouldn't be a problem… if ZUN didn't store the resulting lookup tables in the .DATA segment. With code segments, we can easily split them at pretty much any point between functions because there are multiple of them. But there's only a single .DATA segment, with all ZUN and master.lib data sandwiched between Borland C++'s crt0 at the top, and Borland C++'s library functions at the bottom of the segment. Adding another split point would require all data after that point to be moved to its own translation unit, which in turn requires EXTERN references in the big .ASM file to all that moved data… in short, it would turn the codebase into an even greater mess.
Declaring the labels as EXTERN wouldn't work either, since the linker can't do fancy arithmetic and is limited to simply replacing address placeholders with one single address. So, we're now stuck with this function at the bottom of the SHARED segment, for the foreseeable future.


We can still continue to separate functions off the top of that segment, though. Pretty much the only thing noteworthy there, so far: TH04's code for loading stage tile images from .MPN files, which we hadn't reverse-engineered so far, and which nicely fit into one of Blue Bolt's pending ⅓ RE contributions. Yup, we finally moved the RE% bars again! If only for a tiny bit. :tannedcirno:
Both TH02 and TH05 simply store one pointer to one dynamically allocated memory block for all tile images, as well as the number of images, in the data segment. TH04, on the other hand, reserves memory for 8 .MPN slots, complete with their color palettes, even though it only ever uses the first one of these. There goes another 458 bytes of conventional RAM… I should start summing up all the waste we've seen so far. Let's put the next website contribution towards a tagging system for these blog posts.

At 86% of technical debt in the SHARED segment repaid, we aren't quite done yet, but the rest is mostly just TH04 needing to catch up with functions we've already separated. Next up: Getting to that practical 98.5% point. Since this is very likely to not require a full push, I'll also decompile some more actual TH04 and TH05 game code I previously reverse-engineered – and after that, reopen the store!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0128, P0129
Commits:
dc65b59...dde36f7, dde36f7...f4c2e45
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ file-format+ gameplay+ card-flipping+ waste- hidden-content+ bug+

So, only one card-flipping function missing, and then we can start decompiling TH01's two final bosses? Unfortunately, that had to be the one big function that initializes and renders all gameplay objects. #17 on the list of longest functions in all of PC-98 Touhou, requiring two pushes to fully understand what's going on there… and then it immediately returns for all "boss" stages whose number is divisible by 5, yet is still called during Sariel's and Konngara's initialization 🤦

Oh well. This also involved the final file format we hadn't looked at yet – the STAGE?.DAT files that describe the layout for all stages within a single 5-stage scene. Which, for a change is a very well-designed form– no, of course it's completely weird, what did you expect? Development must have looked somewhat like this:

  • Weirdness #1: :zunpet: "Hm, the stage format should include the file names for the background graphics and music… or should it?" And so, the 22-byte header still references some music and background files that aren't part of the final game. The game doesn't use anything from there, and instead derives those file names from the scene ID.
    That's probably nothing new to anyone who has ever looked at TH01's data files. In a slightly more interesting discovery though, seeing the+ 📝 .GRF extension, in some of the file names that are short enough to not cut it off, confirms that .GRF was initially used for background images. Probably before ZUN learned about .PI, and how it achieves better compression than his own per-bitplane RLE approach?
  • Weirdness #2: :zunpet: "Hm, I might want to put obstacles on top of cards?" You'd probably expect this format to contain one single array for every stage, describing which object to place on every 32×32 tile, if any. Well, the real format uses two arrays: One for the cards, and a combined one for all "obstacles" – bumpers, bumper bars, turrets, and portals. However, none of the card-flipping stages in the final game come with any such overlaps. That's quite unfortunate, as it would have made for some quite interesting level designs:

    As you can see, the final version of the blitting code was not written with such overlaps in mind either, blitting the cards on top of all the obstacles, and not the other way round.

  • Weirdness #3: :zunpet: "In contrast to obstacles, of which there are multiple types, cards only really need 1 bit. Time for some bit twiddling!" Not the worst idea, given that the 640×336 playfield can fit 20×10 cards, which would fit exactly into 25 bytes if you use a single bit to indicate card or no card. But for whatever reason, ZUN only stored 4 card bits per byte, leaving the other 4 bits unused, and needlessly blowing up that array to 50 bytes. 🤷

    Oh, and did I mention that the contents of the STAGE?.DAT files are loaded into the main data segment, even though the game immediately parses them into something more conveniently accessible? That's another 1250 bytes of memory wasted for no reason…

  • Weirdness #4: :zunpet: "Hm, how about requiring the player to flip some of the cards multiple times? But I've already written all this bit twiddling code to store 4 cards in 1 byte. And if cards should need anywhere from 1 to 4 flips, that would need at least 2 more bits, which won't fit into the unused 4 bits either…" This feature must have come later, because the final game uses 3 "obstacle" type IDs to act as a flip count modifier for a card at the same relative array position. Complete with lookup code to find the actual card index these modifiers belong to, and ridiculous switch statements to not include those non-obstacles in the game's internal obstacle array. :tannedcirno:

With all that, it's almost not worth mentioning how there are 12 turret types, which only differ in which hardcoded pellet group they fire at a hardcoded interval of either 100 or 200 frames, and that they're all explicitly spelled out in every single switch statement. Or how the layout of the internal card and obstacle SoA classes is quite disjointed. So here's the new ZUN bugs you've probably already been expecting!


Cards and obstacles are blitted to both VRAM pages. This way, any other entities moving on top of them can simply be unblitted by restoring pixels from VRAM page 1, without requiring the stationary objects to be redrawn from main memory. Obviously, the backgrounds behind the cards have to be stored somewhere, since the player can remove them. For faster transitions between stages of a scene, ZUN chose to store the backgrounds behind obstacles as well. This way, the background image really only needs to be blitted for the first stage in a scene.

All that memory for the object backgrounds adds up quite a bit though. ZUN actually made the correct choice here and picked a memory allocation function that can return more than the 64 KiB of a single x86 Real Mode segment. He then accesses the individual backgrounds via regular array subscripts… and that's where the bug lies, because he stores the returned address in a regular far pointer rather than a huge one. This way, the game still can only display a total of 102 objects (i. e., cards and obstacles combined) per stage, without any unblitting glitches.
What a shame, that limit could have been 127 if ZUN didn't needlessly allocate memory for alpha planes when backing up VRAM content. :onricdennat:

And since array subscripts on far pointers wrap around after 64 KiB, trying to save the background of the 103rd object is guaranteed to corrupt the memory block header at the beginning of the returned segment. :zunpet:. When TH01 runs in test mode, it correctly reports a corrupted heap in this case.


Finally, some unused content! Upon discovering TH01's debug mode, probably everyone tried to access Stage 21, just to see what happens, and indeed landed in an actual stage, with a black background and a weird color palette. Turns out that ZUN did ship an unused scene in SCENE7.DAT, which is exactly was loaded there.
Unfortunately, it's easy to believe that this is just garbage data (as I initially did): At the beginning of "Stage 22", the game seems to enter an infinite loop somewhere during the flip-in animation.

Well, we've had a heap overflow above, and the cause here is nothing but a stack buffer overflow – a perhaps more modern kind of classic C bug, given its prevalence in the Windows Touhou games. Explained in a few lines of code:

void stageobjs_init_and_render()
{
	int card_animation_frames[50]; // even though there can be up to 200?!
	int total_frames = 0;

	(code that would end up resetting total_frames if it ever tried to reset
	card_animation_frames[50]…)
}
The number of cards in "Stage 22"? 76. There you have it.

But of course, it's trivial to disable this animation and fix these stage transitions. So here they are, Stages 21 to 24, as shipped with the game in STAGE7.DAT:


Wow, what a mess. All that was just a bit too much to be covered in two pushes… Next up, assuming the current subscriptions: Taking a vacation with one smaller TH01 push, covering some smaller functions here and there to ensure some uninterrupted Konngara progress later on.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0123
Commits:
4406c3d...72dfa09
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ file-format+ blitting+ waste- jank+

Done with the .BOS format, at last! While there's still quite a bunch of undecompiled non-format blitting code left, this was in fact the final piece of graphics format loading code in TH01.

📝 Continuing the trend from three pushes ago, we've got yet another class, this time for the 48×48 and 48×32 sprites used in Reimu's gohei, slide, and kick animations. The only reason these had to use the .BOS format at all is simply because Reimu's regular sprites are 32×32, and are therefore loaded from 📝 .PTN files.
Yes, this makes no sense, because why would you split animations for the same character across two file formats and two APIs, just because of a sprite size difference? This necessity for switching blitting APIs might also explain why Reimu vanishes for a few frames at the beginning and the end of the gohei swing animation, but more on that once we get to the high-level rendering code.

Now that we've decompiled all the .BOS implementations in TH01, here's an overview of all of them, together with .PTN to show that there really was no reason for not using the .BOS API for all of Reimu's sprites:

CBossEntity CBossAnim CPlayerAnim ptn_* (32×32)
Format .BOS .BOS .BOS .PTN
Hitbox
Byte-aligned blitting
Byte-aligned unblitting
Unaligned blitting Single-line and wave only
Precise unblitting
Per-file sprite limit 8 8 32 64
Pixels blitted at once 16 16 8 32

And even that last property could simply be handled by branching based on the sprite width, and wouldn't be a reason for switching formats. But well, it just wouldn't be TH01 without all that redundant bloat though, would it?

The basic loading, freeing, and blitting code was yet another variation on the other .BOS code we've seen before. So this should have caused just as little trouble as the CBossAnim code… except that CPlayerAnim did add one slightly difficult function to the mix, which led to it requiring almost a full push after all. Similar to 📝 the unblitting code for moving lasers we've seen in the last push, ZUN tries to minimize the amount of VRAM writes when unblitting Reimu's slide animations. Technically, it's only necessary to restore the pixels that Reimu traveled by, plus the ones that wouldn't be redrawn by the new animation frame at the new X position.
The theoretically arbitrary distance between the two sprites is, of course, modeled by a fixed-size buffer on the stack :onricdennat:, coming with the further assumption that the sprite surely hasn't moved by more than 1 horizontal VRAM byte compared to the last frame. Which, of course, results in glitches if that's not the case, leaving little Reimu parts in VRAM if the slide speed ever exceeded 8 pixels per frame. :tannedcirno: (Which it never does, being hardcoded to 6 pixels, but still.). As it also turns out, all those bit masking operations easily lead to incredibly sloppy C code. Which compiles into incredibly terrible ASM, which in turn might end up wasting way more CPU time than the final VRAM write optimization would have gained? Then again, in-depth profiling is way beyond the scope of this project at this point.

Next up: The TH04 main menu, and some more technical debt.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0122
Commits:
164591f...4406c3d
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ blitting+ waste- jank+ gameplay+ laser+

This time around, laser is 📝 actually not difficult, with TH01's shootout laser class being simple enough to nicely fit into a single push. All other stationary lasers (as used by YuugenMagan, for example) don't even use a class, and are simply treated as regular lines with collision detection.

But of course, the shootout lasers also come with the typical share of TH01 jank we've all come to expect by now. This time, it already starts with the hardcoded sprite data:

A shootout laser can have a width from 1 to 8 pixels, so ZUN stored a separate 16×1 sprite with a line for each possible width (left-to-right). Then, he shifted all of these sprites 1 pixel to the right for all of the 8 possible start positions within a planar VRAM byte (top-to-bottom). Because… doing that bit shift programmatically is way too expensive, so let's pre-shift at compile time, and use 16× the memory per sprite? :tannedcirno:

Since a bunch of other sprite sheets need to be pre-shifted as well (this is the 5th one we've found so far), our sprite converter has a feature to automatically generate those pre-shifted variations. This way, we can abstract away that implementation detail and leave modders with .BMP files that still only contain a single version of each sprite. But, uh…, wait, in this sprite sheet, the second row for 1-pixel lasers is accidentally shifted right by one more pixel that it should have been?! Which means that

  1. we can't use the auto-preshift feature here, and have to store this weird-looking (and quite frankly, completely unnecessary) sprite sheet in its entirety
  2. ZUN did, at least during TH01's development, not have a sprite converter, and directly hardcoded these dot patterns in the C++ code :zunpet:


The waste continues with the class itself. 69 bytes, with 22 bytes outright unused, and 11 not really necessary. As for actual innovations though, we've got 📝 another 32-bit fixed-point type, this time actually using 8 bits for the fractional part. Therefore, the ray position is tracked to the 1/256th of a pixel, using the full precision of master.lib's 8-bit sin() and cos() lookup tables.
Unblitting is also remarkably efficient: It's only done once the laser stopped extending and started moving, and only for the exact pixels at the start of the ray that the laser traveled by in a single frame. If only the ray part was also rendered as efficiently – it's fully blitted every frame, right next to the collision detection for each row of the ray.


With a public interface of two functions (spawn, and update / collide / unblit / render), that's superficially all there is to lasers in this game. There's another (apparently inlined) function though, to both reset and, uh, "fully unblit" all lasers at the end of every boss fight… except that it fails hilariously at doing the latter, and ends up effectively unblitting random 32-pixel line segments, due to ZUN confusing both the coordinates and the parameter types for the line unblitting function. :zunpet:
A while ago, I was asked about this crash that tends to happen when defeating Elis. And while you can clearly see the random unblitted line segments that are missing from the sprites, I don't quite think we've found the cause for the crash, since the 📝 line unblitting function used there does clip its coordinates to the VRAM range.

Next up: The final piece of image format code in TH01, covering Reimu's sprites!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0120, P0121
Commits:
453dd3c...3c008b6, 3c008b6...5c42fcd
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ pc98+ blitting+ waste- jank+ boss+ mima-th01+

Back to TH01, and its boss sprite format… with a separate class for storing animations that only differs minutely from the 📝 regular boss entity class I covered last time? Decompiling this class was almost free, and the main reason why the first of these pushes ended up looking pretty huge.

Next up were the remaining shape drawing functions from the code segment that started with the .GRC functions. P0105 already started these with the (surprisingly sanely implemented) 8×8 diamond, star, and… uh, snowflake (?) sprites , prominently seen in the Konngara, Elis, and Sariel fights, respectively. Now, we've also got:

  • ellipse arcs with a customizable angle distance between the individual dots – mostly just used for drawing full circles, though
  • line loops – which are only used for the rotating white squares around Mima, meaning that the white star in the YuugenMagan fight got a completely redundant reimplementation
  • and the surprisingly weirdest one, drawing the red invincibility sprites.
The weirdness becomes obvious with just a single screenshot:

First, we've got the obvious issue of the sprites not being clipped at the right edge of VRAM, with the rightmost pixels in each row of the sprite extending to the beginning of the next row. Well, that's just what you get if you insist on writing unique low-level blitting code for the majority of the individual sprites in the game… 🤷
More importantly though, the sprite sheet looks like this: So how do we even get these fully filled red diamonds?

Well, turns out that the sprites are never consistently unblitted during their 8 frames of animation. There is a function that looks like it unblits the sprite… except that it starts with by enabling the GRCG and… reading from the first bitplane on the background page? If this was the EGC, such a read would fill some internal registers with the contents of all 4 bitplanes, which can then subsequently be blitted to all 4 bitplanes of any VRAM page with a single memory write. But with the GRCG in RMW mode, reads do nothing special, and simply copy the memory contents of one bitplane to the read destination. Maybe ZUN thought that setting the RMW color to red also sets some internal 4-plane mask register to match that color? :zunpet:
Instead, the rather random pixels read from the first bitplane are then used as a mask for a second blit of the same red sprite. Effectively, this only really "unblits" the invincibility pixels that are drawn on top of Reimu's sprite. Since Reimu is drawn first, the invincibility sprites are overwritten anyway. But due to the palette color layout of Reimu's sprite, its pixels end up fully masking away any invincibility sprite pixels in that second blit, leaving VRAM untouched as a result. Anywhere else though, this animation quickly turns into the union of all animation frames.

Then again, if that 16-dot-aligned rectangular unblitting function is all you know about the EGC, and you can't be bothered to write a perfect unblitter for 8×8 sprites, it becomes obvious why you wouldn't want to use it:

Because Reimu would barely be visible under all that flicker. In comparison, those fully filled diamonds actually look pretty good.


After all that, the remaining time wouldn't have been enough for the next few essential classes, so I closed out the push with three more VRAM effects instead:

  • Single-bitplane pixel inversion inside a 32×32 square – the main effect behind the discoloration seen in the bomb animation, as well as the exploding squares at the end of Kikuri's and Sariel's entrance animation
  • EGC-accelerated VRAM row copies – the second half of smooth and fully hardware-accelerated scrolling for backgrounds that are twice the size of VRAM
  • And finally, the VRAM page content transition function using meshed 8×8 squares, used for the blocky transition to Sariel's first and second phases. Which is quite ridiculous in just how needlessly bloated it is. I'm positive that this sort of thing could have also been accelerated using the PC-98's EGC… although simply writing better C would have already gone a long way. The function also comes with three unused mesh patterns.


And with that, ReC98, as a whole, is not only ⅓ done, but I've also fully caught up with the feature backlog for the first time in the history of this crowdfunding! Time to go into maintenance mode then, while we wait for the next pushes to be funded. Got a huge backlog of tiny maintenance issues to address at a leisurely pace, and of course there's also the 📝 16-bit build system waiting to be finished.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108
Commits:
3622eb6...11b776b, 11b776b...1f1829d, 1f1829d...1650241, 1650241...dcf4e2c
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ meta+ file-format+ animation+ blitting+ boss+ singyoku+ yuugenmagan+ elis+ kikuri+ konngara+ waste-

And indeed, I got to end my vacation with a lot of image format and blitting code, covering the final two formats, .GRC and .BOS. .GRC was nothing noteworthy – one function for loading, one function for byte-aligned blitting, and one function for freeing memory. That's it – not even a unblitting function for this one. .BOS, on the other hand…

…has no generic (read: single/sane) implementation, and is only implemented as methods of some boss entity class. And then again for Sariel's dress and wand animations, and then again for Reimu's animations, both of which weren't even part of these 4 pushes. Looking forward to decompiling essentially the same algorithms all over again… And that's how TH01 became the largest and most bloated PC-98 Touhou game. So yeah, still not done with image formats, even at 44% RE.

This means I also had to reverse-engineer that "boss entity" class… yeah, what else to call something a boss can have multiple of, that may or may not be part of a larger boss sprite, may or may not be animated, and that may or may not have an orb hitbox?
All bosses except for Kikuri share the same 5 global instances of this class. Since renaming all these variables in ASM land is tedious anyway, I went the extra mile and directly defined separate, meaningful names for the entities of all bosses. These also now document the natural order in which the bosses will ultimately be decompiled. So, unless a backer requests anything else, this order will be:

  1. Konngara
  2. Sariel
  3. Elis
  4. Kikuri
  5. SinGyoku
  6. (code for regular card-flipping stages)
  7. Mima
  8. YuugenMagan

As everyone kind of expects from TH01 by now, this class reveals yet another… um, unique and quirky piece of code architecture. In addition to the position and hitbox members you'd expect from a class like this, the game also stores the .BOS metadata – width, height, animation frame count, and 📝 bitplane pointer slot number – inside the same class. But if each of those still corresponds to one individual on-screen sprite, how can YuugenMagan have 5 eye sprites, or Kikuri have more than one soul and tear sprite? By duplicating that metadata, of course! And copying it from one entity to another :onricdennat:
At this point, I feel like I even have to congratulate the game for not actually loading YuugenMagan's eye sprites 5 times. But then again, 53,760 bytes of waste would have definitely been noticeable in the DOS days. Makes much more sense to waste that amount of space on an unused C++ exception handler, and a bunch of redundant, unoptimized blitting functions :tannedcirno:

(Thinking about it, YuugenMagan fits this entire system perfectly. And together with its position in the game's code – last to be decompiled means first on the linker command line – we might speculate that YuugenMagan was the first boss to be programmed for TH01?)

So if a boss wants to use sprites with different sizes, there's no way around using another entity. And that's why Girl-Elis and Bat-Elis are two distinct entities internally, and have to manually sync their position. Except that there's also a third one for Attacking-Girl-Elis, because Girl-Elis has 9 frames of animation in total, and the global .BOS bitplane pointers are divided into 4 slots of only 8 images each. :zunpet:
Same for SinGyoku, who is split into a sphere entity, a person entity, and a… white flash entity for all three forms, all at the same resolution. Or Konngara's facial expressions, which also require two entities just for themselves.


And once you decompile all this code, you notice just how much of it the game didn't even use. 13 of the 50 bytes of the boss entity class are outright unused, and 10 bytes are used for a movement clamping and lock system that would have been nice if ZUN also used it outside of Kikuri's soul sprites. Instead, all other bosses ignore this system completely, and just party on the X/Y coordinates of the boss entities directly.

As for the rendering functions, 5 out of 10 are unused. And while those definitely make up less than half of the code, I still must have spent at least 1 of those 4 pushes on effectively unused functionality.
Only one of these functions lends itself to some speculation. For Elis' entrance animation, the class provides functions for wavy blitting and unblitting, which use a separate X coordinate for every line of the sprite. But there's also an unused and sort of broken one for unblitting two overlapping wavy sprites, located at the same Y coordinate. This might indicate that Elis could originally split herself into two sprites, similar to TH04 Stage 6 Yuuka? Or it might just have been some other kind of animation effect, who knows.


After over 3 months of TH01 progress though, it's finally time to look at other games, to cover the rest of the crowdfunding backlog. Next up: Going back to TH05, and getting rid of those last PI false positives. And since I can potentially spend the next 7 weeks on almost full-time ReC98 work, I've also re-opened the store until October!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0103, P0104
Commits:
b60f38d...05c0028, 05c0028...3622eb6
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ hud+ file-format+ jank+ waste-

It's vacation time! Which, for ReC98, means "relaxing by looking at something boring and uninteresting that we'll ultimately have to cover anyway"… like the TH01 HUD.

📝 As noted earlier, all the score, card combo, stage, and time numbers are drawn into VRAM. Which turns TH01's HUD rendering from the trivial, gaiji-assisted text RAM writes we see in later games to something that, once again, requires blitting and unblitting steps. For some reason though, everything on there is blitted to both VRAM pages? And that's why the HUD chose to allocate a bunch of .PTN sprite slots to store the background behind all "animated" elements at the beginning of a 4-stage scene or boss battle… separately for every affected 16×16 area. (Looking forward to the completely unnecessary code in the Sariel fight that updates these slots after the backgrounds were animated!) And without any separation into helper functions, we end up with the same blitting calls separately copy-pasted for every single HUD element. That's why something as seemingly trivial as this isn't even done after 2 pushes, as we're still missing the stage timer.

Thankfully, the .PTN function signatures come with none of ZUN's little inconsistencies, so I was able to mostly reduce this copy-pasta to a bunch of small inline functions and macros. Those interfaces still remain a bit annoying, though. As a 32×32 format, .PTN merely supports 16×16 sprites with a separate bunch of functions that take an additional quarter parameter from 0 to 3, to select one of the 4 16×16 quarters in a such a sprite…


For life and bomb counts, there was no way around VRAM though, since ZUN wanted to use more than a single color for those. This is where we find at least somewhat of a mildly interesting quirk in all of this: Any life counts greater than the intended 6 will wrap into new rows, with the bombs in the second row overlapping those excess lives. With the way the rest of the HUD rendering works, that wrapping code code had to be explicitly written… which means that ZUN did in fact accomodate (his own?) cheating there.


Now, I promised image formats, and in the middle of this copy-pasta, we did get one… sort of. MASK.GRF, the red HUD background, is entirely handled with two small bespoke functions… and that's all the code we have for this format. Basically, it's a variation on the 📝 .GRZ format we've seen earlier. It uses the exact same RLE algorithm, but only has a single byte stream for both RLE commands and pixel data… as you would expect from an RLE format.

.GRF actually stores 4 separately encoded RLE streams, which suggests that it was intended for full 16-color images. Unfortunately, MASK.GRF only contains 4 copies of the same HUD background :zunpet:, so no unused beta data for us there. The only thing we could derive from 4 identical bitplanes would be that the background was originally meant to be drawn using color #15, rather than the red seen in the final game. Color #15 is a stage-specific background color that would have made the HUD blend in quite nicely – in the YuugenMagan fight, it's the changing color of the in the background, for example. But really, with no generic implementation of this format, that's all just speculation.

Oh, and in case you were looking for a rip of that image:


So yeah, more of the usual TH01 code, with the usual small quirks, but nothing all too horrible – as expected. Next up: The image formats that didn't make it into this push.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0092, P0093, P0094
Commits:
29c5a73...4403308, 4403308...0e73029, 0e73029...57a8487
💰 Funded by:
Yanga, Ember2528
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ file-format+ menu+ score+ jank+ waste-

Three pushes to decompile the TH01 high score menu… because it's completely terrible, and needlessly complicated in pretty much every aspect:

  • Another, final set of differences between the REIIDEN.EXE and FUUIN.EXE versions of the code. Which are so insignificant that it must mean that ZUN kept this code in two separate, manually and imperfectly synced files. The REIIDEN.EXE version, only shown when game-overing, automatically jumps to the enter/ button after the 8th character was entered, and also has a completely invisible timeout that force-enters a high score name after 1000… key presses? Not frames? Why. Like, how do you even realistically such a number. (Best guess: It's a hidden easter egg to amuse players who place drinking glasses on cursor keys. Or beer bottles.)
    That's all the differences that are maybe visible if you squint hard enough. On top of that though, we got a bunch of further, minor code organization differences that serve no purpose other than to waste decompilation time, and certainly did their part in stretching this out to 3 pushes instead of 2.
  • Entered names are restricted to a set of 16-bit, full-width Shift-JIS codepoints, yet are still accessed as 8-bit byte arrays everywhere. This bloats both the C++ and generated ASM code with needless byte splits, swaps, and bit shifts. Same for the route kanji. You have this 16-, heck, even 32-bit CPU, why not use it?! (Fun fact: FUUIN.EXE is explicitly compiled for a 80186, for the most part – unlike REIIDEN.EXE, which does use Turbo C++'s 80386 mode.)
  • The sensible way of storing the current position of the alphabet cursor would simply be two variables, indicating the logical row and column inside the character map. When rendering, you'd then transform these into screen space. This can keep the on-screen position constants in a single place of code.
    TH01 does the opposite: The selected character is stored directly in terms of its on-screen position, which is then mapped back to a character index for every processed input and the subsequent screen update. There's no notion of a logical row or column anywhere, and consequently, the position constants are vomited all over the code.
  • Which might not be as bad if the character map had a uniform grid structure, with no gaps. But the one in TH01 looks like this: And with no sense of abstraction anywhere, both input handling and rendering end up with a separate if branch for at least 4 of the 6 rows.

In the end, I just gave up with my usual redundancy reduction efforts for this one. Anyone wanting to change TH01's high score name entering code would be better off just rewriting the entire thing properly.

And that's all of the shared code in TH01! Both OP.EXE and FUUIN.EXE are now only missing the actual main menu and ending code, respectively. Next up, though: The long awaited TH01 PI push. Which will not only deliver 100% PI for OP.EXE and FUUIN.EXE, but also probably quite some gains in REIIDEN.EXE. With now over 30% of the game decompiled, it's about time we get to look at some gameplay code!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0085
Commits:
110d6dd...54ee99b
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ blitting+ animation+ waste- good-code+

Wait, PI for FUUIN.EXE is mainly blocked by the high score menu? That one should really be properly decompiled in a separate RE push, since it's also present in largely identical form in REIIDEN.EXE… but I currently lack the explicit funding to do that.

And as it turns out I shouldn't really capture any of the existing generic RE contributions for it either. Back in 2018 when I ran the crowdfunding on the Touhou Patch Center Discord server, I said that generic RE contributions would never go towards TH01. No one was interested in that game back then, and as it's significantly different from all the other games, it made sense to only cover it if explicitly requested.
As Touhou Patch Center still remains one of the biggest supporters and advertisers for ReC98, someone recently believed that this rule was still in effect, despite not being mentioned anywhere on this website.

Fast forward to today, and TH01 has become the single most supported game lately, with plenty of incomplete pushes still open to be completed. Reverse-engineering it has proven to be quite efficient, yielding lots of completion percentage points per push. This, I suppose, is exactly what backers that don't give any specific priorities are mainly interested in. Therefore, I will allocate future partial contributions to TH01, whenever it makes sense.

So, instead of rushing TH01 PI, let's wait for Ember2528's April subscription, and get the 25% total RE milestone with some TH05 PI progress instead. This one primarily focused on the gather circles (spirals…?), the third-last missing entity type in TH05. These are rendered using the same 8×8 pellet sprite introduced in TH02… except that the actual pellets received a darkened bottom part in TH04 . Which, in turn, is actually rendered quite efficiently – the games first render the top white part of all pellets, followed by the bottom gray part of all pellets. The PC-98 GRCG is used throughout the process, doing its typical job of accelerating monochrome blitting, and by arranging the rendering like this, only two GRCG color changes are required to draw any number of pellets. I guess that makes it quite a worthwhile optimization? Don't ask me for specific performance numbers or even saved cycles, though :onricdennat:

Next up, one more TH05 PI push!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0083
Commits:
f6cbff0...dfac2f2
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ file-format+ waste- good-code+

Nope, RL has given me plenty of things to do from home after all, so the current cap still remains an accurate representation of my free time. 😕

For now though, we've got one more TH01 file format push, covering the core functions for loading and displaying the 32×32 and 16×16 sprites from the .PTN files, as announced – and probably one of the last ones for quite a while to yield both RE and PI progress way above average. But what is this, error return values in a ZUN game?! And actually good code for deriving the alpha channel from the 16th color in the hardware palette?! Sure, the rest of the code could still be improved a lot, but that was quite a surprise, especially after the spaghetti code of 📝 the last push. That makes up for two of the .PTN structure fields (one of them always 0, and one of them always 1) remaining unused, and therefore unknown.

ZUN also uses the .PTN image slots to store the background of frequently updated VRAM sections, in order to be able to repeatedly draw on top of them – like for example the HUD area where the score and time numbers are drawn. Future games would simply use the text RAM and gaiji for those numbers. This would have worked just fine for TH01 too – especially since all the functions decompiled so far align the VRAM X coordinate to the 8-pixel byte grid, which is the simplest way of accessing VRAM given the PC-98's planar memory layout. Looks as if ZUN simply wasn't aware of gaiji during the development of TH01.

This won't be the last time I cover the .PTN format, since all the blitting functions that actually use alpha are exclusive to REIIDEN.EXE, and currently out of decompilation reach. But after some more long overdue cleaning work, TH01 has now passed both TH02 and even TH04 to become the second-most reverse-engineered game in all of ReC98, in terms of absolute numbers! 🎉

Also, PI for TH01's OP.EXE is imminent. Next up though, we've first got the probably final double-speed push for TH01, covering the last set of duplicated functions between the three binaries – quite fitting for the currently last fully funded, outstanding TH01 RE push. Then, we also might get FUUIN.EXE PI within the same push afterwards? After that, TH01 progress will be slowing down, since I'd then have to cover either the main menu or in-game code or the cutscenes, depending on what the backers request. (By default, it's going to be in-game code, of course.)

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0081
Commits:
0252da2...5ac9b30
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ file-format+ blitting+ waste- contribution-ideas+

Sadly, we've already reached the end of fast triple-speed TH01 progress with 📝 the last push, which decompiled the last segment shared by all three of TH01's executables. There's still a bit of double-speed progress left though, with a small number of code segments that are shared between just two of the three executables.

At the end of the first one of these, we've got all the code for the .GRZ format – which is yet another run-length encoded image format, but this time storing up to 16 full 640×400 16-color images with an alpha bit. This one is exclusively used to wastefully store Konngara's sword slash and kuji-in kill animations. Due to… suboptimal code organization, the code for the format is also present in OP.EXE, despite not being used there. But hey, that brings TH01 to over 20% in RE!

Decoupling the RLE command stream from the pixel data sounds like a nice idea at first, allowing the format to efficiently encode a variety of animation frames displayed all over the screen… if ZUN actually made use of it. The RLE stream also has quite some ridiculous overhead, starting with 1 byte to store the 1-bit command (putting a single 8×1 pixel block, or entering a run of N such blocks). Run commands then store another 1-byte run length, which has to be followed by another command byte to identify the run as putting N blocks, or skipping N blocks. And the pixel data is just a sequence of these blocks for all 4 bitplanes, in uncompressed form…

Also, have some rips of all the images this format is used for:

To make these, I just wrote a small viewer, calling the same decompiled TH01 code: 2020-03-07-grzview.zip Obviously, this means that it not only must to be run on a PC-98, but also discards the alpha information. If any backers are really interested in having a proper converter to and from PNG, I can implement that in an upcoming push… although that would be the perfect thing for outside contributors to do.

Next up, we got some code for the PI format… oh, wait, the actual files are called "GRP" in TH01.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0066
Commits:
042b780...e55a48b
💰 Funded by:
Yanga, Splashman
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ palette+ tcc+ waste-

So, the thing that made me so excited about TH01 were all those bulky C reimplementations of master.lib functions. Identical copies in all three executables, trivial to figure out and decompile, removing tons of instructions, and providing a foundation for large parts of the game later. The first set of functions near the end of that shared code segment deals with color palette handling, and master.lib's resident palette structure in particular. (No relation to the game's resident structure.) Which directly starts us out with pretty much all the decompilation difficulties imaginable:

  • iteration over internal DOS structures via segment pointers – Turbo C++ doesn't support a lot of arithmetic on those, requiring tons of casts to make it work
  • calls to a far function near the beginning of a segment from a function near the end of a segment – these are undecompilable until we've decompiled both functions (and thus, the majority of the segment), and need to be spelled out in ASM for the time being. And if the caller then stores some of the involved variables in registers, there's no way around the ugliest of workarounds, spelling out opcode bytes
  • surprising color format inconsistencies – apparently, GRB (rather than RGB) is some sort of wider standard in PC-98 inter-process communication, because it matches the order of the hardware's palette register ports? (0AAh = green, 0ACh = red, 0AEh = blue)? Yet the game's actual palette still uses RGB…

And as it turns out, the game doesn't even use the resident palette feature. Which adds yet another set of functions to the, uh, learning experience that ZUN must have chosen this game to be. I wouldn't be surprised if we manage to uncover actual scrapped beta game content later on, among all the unused code that's bound to still be in there.

At least decompilation should get easier for the next few TH01 pushes now… right?

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0063
Commits:
034ae4b...8dbb450
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ file-format+ score+ waste- jank+

Almost!

Just like most of the time, it was more sensible to cover GENSOU.SCR, the last structure missing in TH05's OP.EXE, everywhere it's used, rather than just rushing out OP.EXE position independence. I did have to look into all of the functions to fully RE it after all, and to find out whether the unused fields actually are unused. The only thing that kept this push from yielding even more above-average progress was the sheer inconsistency in how the games implemented the operations on this PC-98 equivalent of score*.dat:

  • OP.EXE declares two structure instances, for simultaneous access to both Reimu and Marisa scores. TH05 with its 4 playable characters instead uses a single one, and overwrites it successively for each character when drawing the high score menu – meaning, you'd only see Yuuka's scores when looking at the structure inside the rendered high score menu. However, it still declares the TH04 "Marisa" structure as a leftover… and also decodes it and verifies its checksum, despite nothing being ever loaded into it
  • MAIN.EXE uses a separate ASM implementation of the decoding and encoding functions :godzun:
  • TH05's MAIN.EXE also reimplements the basic loading functions in ASM – without the code to regenerate GENSOU.SCR with default data if the file is missing or corrupted. That actually makes sense, since any regeneration is already done in OP.EXE, which always has to load that file anyway to check how much has been cleared
  • However, there is a regeneration function in TH05's MAINE.EXE… which actually generates different default data: OP.EXE consistently sets Extra Stage records to Stage 1, while MAINE.EXE uses the same place-based stage numbering that both versions use for the regular ranks

Technically though, TH05's OP.EXE is position-independent now, and the rest are (should be? :tannedcirno:) merely false positives. However, TH04's is still missing another structure, in addition to its false positives. So, let's wait with the big announcement until the next push… which will also come with a demo video of what will be possible then.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0060
Commits:
29385dd...73f5ae7
💰 Funded by:
Touhou Patch Center
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th03+ th04+ th05+ blitting+ micro-optimization+ waste-

So, where to start? Well, TH04 bullets are hard, so let's procrastinate start with TH03 instead :tannedcirno: The 📝 sprite display functions are the obvious blocker for any structure describing a sprite, and therefore most meaningful PI gains in that game… and I actually did manage to fit a decompilation of those three functions into exactly the amount of time that the Touhou Patch Center community votes alloted to TH03 reverse-engineering!

And a pretty amazing one at that. The original code was so obviously written in ASM and was just barely decompilable by exclusively using register pseudovariables and a bit of goto, but I was able to abstract most of that away, not least thanks to a few helpful optimization properties of Turbo C++… seriously, I can't stop marveling at this ancient compiler. The end result is both readable, clear, and dare I say portable?! To anyone interested in porting TH03, take a look. How painful would it be to port that away from 16-bit x86?

However, this push is also a typical example that the RE/PI priorities can only control what I look at, and the outcome can actually differ greatly. Even though the priorities were 65% RE and 35% PI, the progress outcome was +0.13% RE and +1.35% PI. But hey, we've got one more push with a focus on TH03 PI, so maybe that one will include more RE than PI, and then everything will end up just as ordered? :onricdennat:

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0047, P0048
Commits:
9a2c6f7...893bd46
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ player+ shot+ animation+ waste-

So, let's continue with player shots! …eh, or maybe not directly, since they involve two other structure types in TH05, which we'd have to cover first. One of them is a different sort of sprite, and since I like me some context in my reverse-engineering, let's disable every other sprite type first to figure out what it is.

One of those other sprite types were the little sparks flying away from killed stage enemies, midbosses, and grazed bullets; easy enough to also RE right now. Turns out they use the same 8 hardcoded 8×8 sprites in TH02, TH04, and TH05. Except that it's actually 64 16×8 sprites, because ZUN wanted to pre-shift them for all 8 possible start pixels within a planar VRAM byte (rather than, like, just writing a few instructions to shift them programmatically), leading to them taking up 1,024 bytes rather than just 64.
Oh, and the thing I wanted to RE *actually* was the decay animation whenever a shot hits something. Not too complex either, especially since it's exclusive to TH05.

And since there was some time left and I actually have to pick some of the next RE places strategically to best prepare for the upcoming 17 decompilation pushes, here's two more function pointers for good measure.