⮜ Blog

⮜ List of tags

Showing all posts tagged

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0264, P0265
⌨ Commits:
46cd6e7...78728f6, 78728f6...ff19bed
💰 Funded by:
Blue Bolt, [Anonymous], iruleatgames
🏷 Tags:

Oh, it's 2024 already and I didn't even have a delivery for December or January? Yeah… I can only repeat what I said at the end of November, although the finish line is actually in sight now. With 10 pushes across 4 repositories and a blog post that has already reached a word count of 9,240, the Shuusou Gyoku SC-88Pro BGM release is going to break 📝 both the push record set by TH01 Sariel two years ago, and 📝 the blog post length record set by the last Shuusou Gyoku delivery. Until that's done though, let's clear some more PC-98 Touhou pushes out of the backlog, and continue the preparation work for the non-ASCII translation project starting later this year.

But first, we got another free bugfix according to my policy! 📝 Back in April 2022 when I researched the Divide Error crash that can occur in TH04's Stage 4 Marisa fight, I proposed and implemented four possible workarounds and let the community pick one of them for the generally recommended small bugfix mod. I still pushed the others onto individual branches in case the gameplay community ever wants to look more closely into them and maybe pick a different one… except that I accidentally pushed the wrong code for the warp workaround, probably because I got confused with the second warp variant I developed later on.
Fortunately, I still had the intended code for both variants lying around, and used the occasion to merge the current master branch into all of these mod branches. Thanks to wyatt8740 for spotting and reporting this oversight!

  1. The Music Room background masking effect
  2. The GRCG's plane disabling flags
  3. Text color restrictions
  4. The entire messy rest of the Music Room code
  5. TH04's partially consistent congratulation picture on Easy Mode
  6. TH02's boss position and damage variables

As the final piece of code shared in largely identical form between 4 of the 5 games, the Music Rooms were the biggest remaining piece of low-hanging fruit that guaranteed big finalization% gains for comparatively little effort. They seemed to be especially easy because I already decompiled TH02's Music Room together with the rest of that game's OP.EXE back in early 2015, when this project focused on just raw decompilation with little to no research. 9 years of increased standards later though, it turns out that I missed a lot of details, and ended up renaming most variables and functions. Combined with larger-than-expected changes in later games and the usual quality level of ZUN's menu code, this ended up taking noticeably longer than the single push I expected.

The undoubtedly most interesting part about this screen is the animation in the background, with the spinning and falling polygons cutting into a single-color background to reveal a spacey image below. However, the only background image loaded in the Music Room is OP3.PI (TH02/TH03) or MUSIC3.PI (TH04/TH05), which looks like this in a .PI viewer or when converted into another image format with the usual tools:

TH02's Music Room background in its on-disk state TH03's Music Room background in its on-disk state TH04's Music Room background in its on-disk state TH05's Music Room background in its on-disk state
Let's call this "the blank image".

That is definitely the color that appears on top of the polygons, but where is the spacey background? If there is no other .PI file where it could come from, it has to be somewhere in that same file, right? :thonk:
And indeed: This effect is another bitplane/color palette trick, exactly like the 📝 three falling stars in the background of TH04's Stage 5. If we set every bit on the first bitplane and thus change any of the resulting even hardware palette color indices to odd ones, we reveal a full second 8-color sub-image hiding in the same .PI file:

TH02's Music Room background, with all bits in the first bitplane set to reveal the spacey background image, and the full color palette at the bottom TH03's Music Room background, with all bits in the first bitplane set to reveal the spacey background image, and the full color palette at the bottom TH04's Music Room background, with all bits in the first bitplane set to reveal the spacey background image, and the full color palette at the bottom TH05's Music Room background, with all bits in the first bitplane set to reveal the spacey background image, and the full color palette at the bottom
The spacey sub-image. Never before seen!1!! …OK, touhou-memories beat me by a month. Let's add each image's full 16-color palette to deliver some additional value.

On a high level, the first bitplane therefore acts as a stencil buffer that selects between the blank and spacey sub-image for every pixel. The important part here, however, is that the first bitplane of the blank sub-images does not consist entirely of 0 bits, but does have 1 bits at the pixels that represent the caption that's supposed to be overlaid on top of the animation. Since there now are some pixels that should always be taken from the spacey sub-image regardless of whether they're covered by a polygon, the game can no longer just clear the first bitplane at the start of every frame. Instead, it has to keep a separate copy of the first bitplane's original state (called nopoly_B in the code), captured right after it blitted the .PI image to VRAM. Turns out that this copy also comes in quite handy with the text, but more on that later.


Then, the game simply draws polygons onto only the reblitted first bitplane to conditionally set the respective bits. ZUN used master.lib's grcg_polygon_c() function for this, which means that we can entirely thank the uncredited master.lib developers for this iconic animation – if they hadn't included such a function, the Music Rooms would most certainly look completely different.
This is where we get to complete the series on the PC-98 GRCG chip with the last remaining four bits of its mode register. So far, we only needed the highest bit (0x80) to either activate or deactivate it, and the bit below (0x40) to choose between the 📝 RMW and 📝 TCR/📝 TDW modes. But you can also use the lowest four bits to restrict the GRCG's operations to any subset of the four bitplanes, leaving the other ones untouched:

// Enable the GRCG (0x80) in regular RMW mode (0x40). All bitplanes are
// enabled and written according to the contents of the tile register.
outportb(0x7C, 0xC0);

// The same, but limiting writes to the first bitplane by disabling the
// second (0x02), third (0x04), and fourth (0x08) one, as done in the
// PC-98 Touhou Music Rooms.
outportb(0x7C, 0xCE);

// Regular GRCG blitting code to any VRAM segment…
pokeb(0xA8000, offset, …);

// We're done, turn off the GRCG.
outportb(0x7C, 0x00);

This could be used for some unusual effects when writing to two or three of the four planes, but it seems rather pointless for this specific case at first. If we only want to write to a single plane, why not just do so directly, without the GRCG? Using that chip only involves more hardware and is therefore slower by definition, and the blitting code would be the same, right?
This is another one of these questions that would be interesting to benchmark one day, but in this case, the reason is purely practical: All of master.lib's polygon drawing functions expect the GRCG to be running in RMW mode. They write their pixels as bitmasks where 1 and 0 represent pixels that should or should not change, and leave it to the GRCG to combine these masks with its tile register and OR the result into the bitplanes instead of doing so themselves. Since GRCG writes are done via MOV instructions, not using the GRCG would turn these bitmasks into actual dot patterns, overwriting any previous contents of each VRAM byte that gets modified.
Technically, you'd only have to replace a few MOV instructions with OR to build a non-GRCG version of such a function, but why would you do that if you haven't measured polygon drawing to be an actual bottleneck.

Three overlapping Music Room polygons rendered using master.lib's grcg_polygon_c() function with a disabled GRCGThree overlapping Music Room polygons rendered as in the original game, with the GRCG enabled
An example with three polygons drawn from top to bottom. Without the GRCG, edges of later polygons overwrite any previously drawn pixels within the same VRAM byte. Note how treating bitmasks as dot patterns corrupts even those areas where the background image had nonzero bits in its first bitplane.

As far as complexity is concerned though, the worst part is the implicit logic that allows all this text to show up on top of the polygons in the first place. If every single piece of text is only rendered a single time, how can it appear on top of the polygons if those are drawn every frame?
Depending on the game (because of course it's game-specific), the answer involves either the individual bits of the text color index or the actual contents of the palette:

The contents of nopoly_B with each game's first track selected.

Finally, here's a list of all the smaller details that turn the Music Rooms into such a mess:

And that's all the Music Rooms! The OP.EXE binaries of TH04 and especially TH05 are now very close to being 100% RE'd, with only the respective High Score menus and TH04's title animation still missing. As for actual completion though, the finalization% metric is more relevant as it also includes the ZUN Soft logo, which I RE'd on paper but haven't decompiled. I'm 📝 still hoping that this will be the final piece of code I decompile for these two games, and that no one pays to get it done earlier… :onricdennat:


For the rest of the second push, there was a specific goal I wanted to reach for the remaining anything budget, which was blocked by a few functions at the beginning of TH04's and TH05's MAINE.EXE. In another anticlimactic development, this involved yet another way too early decompilation of a main() function…
Generally, this main() function just calls the top-level functions of all other ending-related screens in sequence, but it also handles the TH04-exclusive congratulating All Clear images within itself. After a 1CC, these are an additional reward on top of the Good Ending, showing the player character wearing a different outfit depending on the selected difficulty. On Easy Mode, however, the Good Ending is unattainable because the game always ends after Stage 5 with a Bad Ending, but ZUN still chose to show the EASY ALL CLEAR!! image in this case, regardless of how many continues you used.
While this might seem inconsistent with the other difficulties, it is consistent within Easy Mode itself, as the enforced Bad Ending after Stage 5 also doesn't distinguish between the number of continues. Also, Try to Normal Rank!! could very well be ZUN's roundabout way of implying "because this is how you avoid the Bad Ending".

With that out of the way, I was finally able to separate the VRAM text renderer of TH04 and TH05 into its own assembly unit, 📝 finishing the technical debt repayment project that I couldn't complete in 2021 due to assembly-time code segment label arithmetic in the data segment. This now allows me to translate this undecompilable self-modifying mess of ASM into C++ for the non-ASCII translation project, and thus unify the text renderers of all games and enhance them with support for Unicode characters loaded from a bitmap font. As the final finalized function in the SHARED segment, it also allowed me to remove 143 lines of particularly ugly segmentation workarounds 🙌


The remaining 1/6th of the second push provided the perfect occasion for some light TH02 PI work. The global boss position and damage variables represented some equally low-hanging fruit, being easily identified global variables that aren't part of a larger structure in this game. In an interesting twist, TH02 is the only game that uses an increasing damage value to track boss health rather than decreasing HP, and also doesn't internally distinguish between bosses and midbosses as far as these variables are concerned. Obviously, there's quite a bit of state left to be RE'd, not least because Marisa is doing her own thing with a bunch of redundant copies of her position, but that was too complex to figure out right now.

Also doing their own thing are the Five Magic Stones, which need five positions rather than a single one. Since they don't move, the game doesn't have to keep 📝 separate position variables for both VRAM pages, and can handle their positions in a much simpler way that made for a nice final commit.
And for the first time in a long while, I quite like what ZUN did there! Not only are their positions stored in an array that is indexed with a consistent ID for every stone, but these IDs also follow the order you fight the stones in: The two inner ones use 0 and 1, the two outer ones use 2 and 3, and the one in the center uses 4. This might look like an odd choice at first because it doesn't match their horizontal order on the playfield. But then you notice that ZUN uses this property in the respective phase control functions to iterate over only the subrange of active stones, and you realize how brilliant it actually is.

Screenshot of TH02's Five Magic Stones, with the first two (both internally and in the order you fight them in) alive and activated Screenshot of TH02's Five Magic Stones, with the second two (both internally and in the order you fight them in) alive and activated Screenshot of TH02's Five Magic Stones, with the last one (both internally and in the order you fight them in) alive and activated

This seems like a really basic thing to get excited about, especially since the rest of their data layout sure isn't perfect. Splitting each piece of state and even the individual X and Y coordinates into separate 5-element arrays is still counter-productive because the game ends up paying more memory and CPU cycles to recalculate the element offsets over and over again than this would have ever saved in cache misses on a 486. But that's a minor issue that could be fixed with a few regex replacements, not a misdesigned architecture that would require a full rewrite to clean it up. Compared to the hardcoded and bloated mess that was 📝 YuugenMagan's five eyes, this is definitely an improvement worthy of the good-code tag. The first actual one in two years, and a welcome change after the Music Room!

These three pieces of data alone yielded a whopping 5% of overall TH02 PI in just 1/6th of a push, bringing that game comfortably over the 60% PI mark. MAINE.EXE is guaranteed to reach 100% PI before I start working on the non-ASCII translations, but at this rate, it might even be realistic to go for 100% PI on MAIN.EXE as well? Or at least technical position independence, without the false positives.

Next up: Shuusou Gyoku SC-88Pro BGM. It's going to be wild.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0174, P0175, P0176, P0177, P0178, P0179, P0180, P0181
⌨ Commits:
27f901c...a0fe812, a0fe812...40ac9a7, 40ac9a7...c5dc45b, c5dc45b...5f0cabc, 5f0cabc...60621f8, 60621f8...9e5b344, 9e5b344...091f19f, 091f19f...313450f
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528, Yanga
🏷 Tags:

Here we go, TH01 Sariel! This is the single biggest boss fight in all of PC-98 Touhou: If we include all custom effect code we previously decompiled, it amounts to a total of 10.31% of all code in TH01 (and 3.14% overall). These 8 pushes cover the final 8.10% (or 2.47% overall), and are likely to be the single biggest delivery this project will ever see. Considering that I only managed to decompile 6.00% across all games in 2021, 2022 is already off to a much better start!

So, how can Sariel's code be that large? Well, we've got:

In total, it's just under 3,000 lines of C++ code, containing a total of 8 definite ZUN bugs, 3 of them being subpixel/pixel confusions. That might not look all too bad if you compare it to the 📝 player control function's 8 bugs in 900 lines of code, but given that Konngara had 0… (Edit (2022-07-17): Konngara contains two bugs after all: A 📝 possible heap corruption in test or debug mode, and the infamous 📝 temporary green discoloration.) And no, the code doesn't make it obvious whether ZUN coded Konngara or Sariel first; there's just as much evidence for either.

Some terminology before we start: Sariel's first form is separated into four phases, indicated by different background images, that cycle until Sariel's HP reach 0 and the second, single-phase form starts. The danmaku patterns within each phase are also on a cycle, and the game picks a random but limited number of patterns per phase before transitioning to the next one. The fight always starts at pattern 1 of phase 1 (the random purple lasers), and each new phase also starts at its respective first pattern.


Sariel's bugs already start at the graphics asset level, before any code gets to run. Some of the patterns include a wand raise animation, which is stored in BOSS6_2.BOS:

TH01 BOSS6_2.BOS
Umm… OK? The same sprite twice, just with slightly different colors? So how is the wand lowered again?

The "lowered wand" sprite is missing in this file simply because it's captured from the regular background image in VRAM, at the beginning of the fight and after every background transition. What I previously thought to be 📝 background storage code has therefore a different meaning in Sariel's case. Since this captured sprite is fully opaque, it will reset the entire 128×128 wand area… wait, 128×128, rather than 96×96? Yup, this lowered sprite is larger than necessary, wasting 1,967 bytes of conventional memory.
That still doesn't quite explain the second sprite in BOSS6_2.BOS though. Turns out that the black part is indeed meant to unblit the purple reflection (?) in the first sprite. But… that's not how you would correctly unblit that?

VRAM after blitting the first sprite of TH01's BOSS6_2.BOS VRAM after blitting the second sprite of TH01's BOSS6_2.BOS

The first sprite already eats up part of the red HUD line, and the second one additionally fails to recover the seal pixels underneath, leaving a nice little black hole and some stray purple pixels until the next background transition. :tannedcirno: Quite ironic given that both sprites do include the right part of the seal, which isn't even part of the animation.


Just like Konngara, Sariel continues the approach of using a single function per danmaku pattern or custom entity. While I appreciate that this allows all pattern- and entity-specific state to be scoped locally to that one function, it quickly gets ugly as soon as such a function has to do more than one thing.
The "bird function" is particularly awful here: It's just one if(…) {…} else if(…) {…} else if(…) {…} chain with different branches for the subfunction parameter, with zero shared code between any of these branches. It also uses 64-bit floating-point double as its subpixel type… and since it also takes four of those as parameters (y'know, just in case the "spawn new bird" subfunction is called), every call site has to also push four double values onto the stack. Thanks to Turbo C++ even using the FPU for pushing a 0.0 constant, we have already reached maximum floating-point decadence before even having seen a single danmaku pattern. Why decadence? Every possible spawn position and velocity in both bird patterns just uses pixel resolution, with no fractional component in sight. And there goes another 720 bytes of conventional memory.

Speaking about bird patterns, the red-bird one is where we find the first code-level ZUN bug: The spawn cross circle sprite suddenly disappears after it finished spawning all the bird eggs. How can we tell it's a bug? Because there is code to smoothly fly this sprite off the playfield, that code just suddenly forgets that the sprite's position is stored in Q12.4 subpixels, and treats it as raw screen pixels instead. :zunpet: As a result, the well-intentioned 640×400 screen-space clipping rectangle effectively shrinks to 38×23 pixels in the top-left corner of the screen. Which the sprite is always outside of, and thus never rendered again.
The intended animation is easily restored though:

Sariel's third pattern, and the first to spawn birds, in its original and fixed versions. Note that I somewhat fixed the bird hatch animation as well: ZUN's code never unblits any frame of animation there, and simply blits every new one on top of the previous one.

Also, did you know that birds actually have a quite unfair 14×38-pixel hitbox? Not that you'd ever collide with them in any of the patterns…

Another 3 of the 8 bugs can be found in the symmetric, interlaced spawn rays used in three of the patterns, and the 32×32 debris "sprites" shown at their endpoint, at the edge of the screen. You kinda have to commend ZUN's attention to detail here, and how he wrote a lot of code for those few rapidly animated pixels that you most likely don't even notice, especially with all the other wrong pixels resulting from rendering glitches. One of the bugs in the very final pattern of phase 4 even turns them into the vortex sprites from the second pattern in phase 1 during the first 5 frames of the first time the pattern is active, and I had to single-step the blitting calls to verify it.
It certainly was annoying how much time I spent making sense of these bugs, and all weird blitting offsets, for just a few pixels… Let's look at something more wholesome, shall we?


So far, we've only seen the PC-98 GRCG being used in RMW (read-modify-write) mode, which I previously 📝 explained in the context of TH01's red-white HP pattern. The second of its three modes, TCR (Tile Compare Read), affects VRAM reads rather than writes, and performs "color extraction" across all 4 bitplanes: Instead of returning raw 1bpp data from one plane, a VRAM read will instead return a bitmask, with a 1 bit at every pixel whose full 4-bit color exactly matches the color at that offset in the GRCG's tile register, and 0 everywhere else. Sariel uses this mode to make sure that the 2×2 particles and the wind effect are only blitted on top of "air color" pixels, with other parts of the background behaving like a mask. The algorithm:

  1. Set the GRCG to TCR mode, and all 8 tile register dots to the air color
  2. Read N bits from the target VRAM position to obtain an N-bit mask where all 1 bits indicate air color pixels at the respective position
  3. AND that mask with the alpha plane of the sprite to be drawn, shifted to the correct start bit within the 8-pixel VRAM byte
  4. Set the GRCG to RMW mode, and all 8 tile register dots to the color that should be drawn
  5. Write the previously obtained bitmask to the same position in VRAM

Quite clever how the extracted colors double as a secondary alpha plane, making for another well-earned good-code tag. The wind effect really doesn't deserve it, though:

As far as I can tell, ZUN didn't use TCR mode anywhere else in PC-98 Touhou. Tune in again later during a TH04 or TH05 push to learn about TDW, the final GRCG mode!


Speaking about the 2×2 particle systems, why do we need three of them? Their only observable difference lies in the way they move their particles:

  1. Up or down in a straight line (used in phases 4 and 2, respectively)
  2. Left or right in a straight line (used in the second form)
  3. Left and right in a sinusoidal motion (used in phase 3, the "dark orange" one)

Out of all possible formats ZUN could have used for storing the positions and velocities of individual particles, he chose a) 64-bit / double-precision floating-point, and b) raw screen pixels. Want to take a guess at which data type is used for which particle system?

If you picked double for 1) and 2), and raw screen pixels for 3), you are of course correct! :godzun: Not that I'm implying that it should have been the other way round – screen pixels would have perfectly fit all three systems use cases, as all 16-bit coordinates are extended to 32 bits for trigonometric calculations anyway. That's what, another 1.080 bytes of wasted conventional memory? And that's even calculated while keeping the current architecture, which allocates space for 3×30 particles as part of the game's global data, although only one of the three particle systems is active at any given time.

That's it for the first form, time to put on "Civilization of Magic"! Or "死なばもろとも"? Or "Theme of 地獄めくり"? Or whatever SYUGEN is supposed to mean…


… and the code of these final patterns comes out roughly as exciting as their in-game impact. With the big exception of the very final "swaying leaves" pattern: After 📝 Q4.4, 📝 Q28.4, 📝 Q24.8, and double variables, this pattern uses… decimal subpixels? Like, multiplying the number by 10, and using the decimal one's digit to represent the fractional part? Well, sure, if you really insist on moving the leaves in cleanly represented integer multiples of ⅒, which is infamously impossible in IEEE 754. Aside from aesthetic reasons, it only really combines less precision (10 possible fractions rather than the usual 16) with the inferior performance of having to use integer divisions and multiplications rather than simple bit shifts. And it's surely not because the leaf sprites needed an extended integer value range of [-3276, +3276], compared to Q12.4's [-2047, +2048]: They are clipped to 640×400 screen space anyway, and are removed as soon as they leave this area.

This pattern also contains the second bug in the "subpixel/pixel confusion hiding an entire animation" category, causing all of BOSS6GR4.GRC to effectively become unused:

The "swaying leaves" pattern. ZUN intended a splash animation to be shown once each leaf "spark" reaches the top of the playfield, which is never displayed in the original game.

At least their hitboxes are what you would expect, exactly covering the 30×30 pixels of Reimu's sprite. Both animation fixes are available on the th01_sariel_fixes branch.

After all that, Sariel's main function turned out fairly unspectacular, just putting everything together and adding some shake, transition, and color pulse effects with a bunch of unnecessary hardware palette changes. There is one reference to a missing BOSS6.GRP file during the first→second form transition, suggesting that Sariel originally had a separate "first form defeat" graphic, before it was replaced with just the shaking effect in the final game.
Speaking about the transition code, it is kind of funny how the… um, imperative and concrete nature of TH01 leads to these 2×24 lines of straight-line code. They kind of look like ZUN rattling off a laundry list of subsystems and raw variables to be reinitialized, making damn sure to not forget anything.


Whew! Second PC-98 Touhou boss completely decompiled, 29 to go, and they'll only get easier from here! 🎉 The next one in line, Elis, is somewhere between Konngara and Sariel as far as x86 instruction count is concerned, so that'll need to wait for some additional funding. Next up, therefore: Looking at a thing in TH03's main game code – really, I have little idea what it will be!

Now that the store is open again, also check out the 📝 updated RE progress overview I've posted together with this one. In addition to more RE, you can now also directly order a variety of mods; all of these are further explained in the order form itself.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0130, P0131
⌨ Commits:
6d69ea8...576def5, 576def5...dc9e3ee
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:

50% hype! 🎉 But as usual for TH01, even that final set of functions shared between all bosses had to consume two pushes rather than one…

First up, in the ongoing series "Things that TH01 draws to the PC-98 graphics layer that really should have been drawn to the text layer instead": The boss HP bar. Oh well, using the graphics layer at least made it possible to have this half-red, half-white pattern for the middle section.
This one pattern is drawn by making surprisingly good use of the GRCG. So far, we've only seen it used for fast monochrome drawing:

// Setting up fast drawing using color #9 (1001 in binary)
grcg_setmode(GC_RMW);
outportb(0x7E, 0xFF); // Plane 0: (B): (********)
outportb(0x7E, 0x00); // Plane 1: (R): (        )
outportb(0x7E, 0x00); // Plane 2: (G): (        )
outportb(0x7E, 0xFF); // Plane 3: (E): (********)

// Write a checkerboard pattern (* * * * ) in color #9 to the top-left corner,
// with transparent blanks. Requires only 1 VRAM write to a single bitplane:
// The GRCG automatically writes to the correct bitplanes, as specified above
*(uint8_t *)(MK_FP(0xA800, 0)) = 0xAA;

But since this is actually an 8-pixel tile register, we can set any 8-pixel pattern for any bitplane. This way, we can get different colors for every one of the 8 pixels, with still just a single VRAM write of the alpha mask to a single bitplane:

grcg_setmode(GC_RMW); //  Final color: (A7A7A7A7)
outportb(0x7E, 0x55); // Plane 0: (B): ( * * * *)
outportb(0x7E, 0xFF); // Plane 1: (R): (********)
outportb(0x7E, 0x55); // Plane 2: (G): ( * * * *)
outportb(0x7E, 0xAA); // Plane 3: (E): (* * * * )

And I thought TH01 only suffered the drawbacks of PC-98 hardware, making so little use of its actual features that it's perhaps not fair to even call it "a PC-98 game"… Still, I'd say that "bad PC-98 port of an idea" describes it best.

However, after that tiny flash of brilliance, the surrounding HP rendering code goes right back to being the typical sort of confusing TH01 jank. There's only a single function for the three distinct jobs of

with magic numbers to select between all of these.

VRAM of course also means that the backgrounds behind the individual hit points have to be stored, so that they can be unblitted later as the boss is losing HP. That's no big deal though, right? Just allocate some memory, copy what's initially in VRAM, then blit it back later using your foundational set of blitting funct– oh, wait, TH01 doesn't have this sort of thing, right :tannedcirno: The closest thing, 📝 once again, are the .PTN functions. And so, the game ends up handling these 8×16 background sprites with 16×16 wrappers around functions for 32×32 sprites. :zunpet: That's quite the recipe for confusion, especially since ZUN preferred copy-pasting the necessary ridiculous arithmetic expressions for calculating positions, .PTN sprite IDs, and the ID of the 16×16 quarter inside the 32×32 sprite, instead of just writing simple helper functions. He did manage to make the result mostly bug-free this time around, though! (Edit (2022-05-31): Nope, there's a 📝 potential heap corruption after all, which can be triggered in some fights in test mode (game t) or debug mode (game d).) There's one minor hit point discoloration bug if the red-white or white sections start at an odd number of hit points, but that's never the case for any of the original 7 bosses.
The remaining sloppiness is ultimately inconsequential as well: The game always backs up twice the number of hit point backgrounds, and thus uses twice the amount of memory actually required. Also, this self-restriction of only unblitting 16×16 pixels at a time requires any remaining odd hit point at the last position to, of course, be rendered again :onricdennat:


After stumbling over the weakest imaginable random number generator, we finally arrive at the shared boss↔orb collision handling function, the final blocker among the final blockers. This function takes a whopping 12 parameters, 3 of them being references to int values, some of which are duplicated for every one of the 7 bosses, with no generic boss struct anywhere. 📝 Previously, I speculated that YuugenMagan might have been the first boss to be programmed for TH01. With all these variables though, there is some new evidence that SinGyoku might have been the first one after all: It's the only boss to use its own HP and phase frame variables, with the other bosses sharing the same two globals.

While this function only handles the response to a boss↔orb collision, it still does way too much to describe it briefly. Took me quite a while to frame it in terms of invincibility (which is the main impact of all of this that can be observed in gameplay code). That made at least some sort of sense, considering the other usages of the variables passed as references to that function. Turns out that YuugenMagan, Kikuri, and Elis abuse what's meant to be the "invincibility frame" variable as a frame counter for some of their animations 🙄
Oh well, the game at least doesn't call the collision handling function during those, so "invincibility frame" is technically still a correct variable name there.


And that's it! We're finally ready to start with Konngara, in 2021. I've been waiting quite a while for this, as all this high-level boss code is very likely to speed up TH01 progress quite a bit. Next up though: Closing out 2020 with more of the technical debt in the other games.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0085
⌨ Commits:
110d6dd...54ee99b
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:

Wait, PI for FUUIN.EXE is mainly blocked by the high score menu? That one should really be properly decompiled in a separate RE push, since it's also present in largely identical form in REIIDEN.EXE… but I currently lack the explicit funding to do that.

And as it turns out, I shouldn't really capture any of the existing generic RE contributions for it either. Back in 2018 when I ran the crowdfunding on the Touhou Patch Center Discord server, I said that generic RE contributions would never go towards TH01. No one was interested in that game back then, and as it's significantly different from all the other games, it made sense to only cover it if explicitly requested.
As Touhou Patch Center still remains one of the biggest supporters and advertisers for ReC98, someone recently believed that this rule was still in effect, despite not being mentioned anywhere on this website.

Fast forward to today, and TH01 has become the single most supported game lately, with plenty of incomplete pushes still open to be completed. Reverse-engineering it has proven to be quite efficient, yielding lots of completion percentage points per push. This, I suppose, is exactly what backers that don't give any specific priorities are mainly interested in. Therefore, I will allocate future partial contributions to TH01, whenever it makes sense.

So, instead of rushing TH01 PI, let's wait for Ember2528's April subscription, and get the 25% total RE milestone with some TH05 PI progress instead. This one primarily focused on the gather circles (spirals…?), the third-last missing entity type in TH05. These are rendered using the same 8×8 pellet sprite introduced in TH02… except that the actual pellets received a darkened bottom part in TH04 . Which, in turn, is actually rendered quite efficiently – the games first render the top white part of all pellets, followed by the bottom gray part of all pellets. The PC-98 GRCG is used throughout the process, doing its typical job of accelerating monochrome blitting, and by arranging the rendering like this, only two GRCG color changes are required to draw any number of pellets. I guess that makes it quite a worthwhile optimization? Don't ask me for specific performance numbers or even saved cycles, though :onricdennat:

Next up, one more TH05 PI push!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0083
⌨ Commits:
f6cbff0...dfac2f2
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:

Nope, RL has given me plenty of things to do from home after all, so the current cap still remains an accurate representation of my free time. 😕

For now though, we've got one more TH01 file format push, covering the core functions for loading and displaying the 32×32 and 16×16 sprites from the .PTN files, as announced – and probably one of the last ones for quite a while to yield both RE and PI progress way above average. But what is this, error return values in a ZUN game?! And actually good code for deriving the alpha channel from the 16th color in the hardware palette?! Sure, the rest of the code could still be improved a lot, but that was quite a surprise, especially after the spaghetti code of 📝 the last push. That makes up for two of the .PTN structure fields (one of them always 0, and one of them always 1) remaining unused, and therefore unknown.

ZUN also uses the .PTN image slots to store the background of frequently updated VRAM sections, in order to be able to repeatedly draw on top of them – like for example the HUD area where the score and time numbers are drawn. Future games would simply use the text RAM and gaiji for those numbers. This would have worked just fine for TH01 too – especially since all the functions decompiled so far align the VRAM X coordinate to the 8-pixel byte grid, which is the simplest way of accessing VRAM given the PC-98's planar memory layout. Looks as if ZUN simply wasn't aware of gaiji during the development of TH01.

This won't be the last time I cover the .PTN format, since all the blitting functions that actually use alpha are exclusive to REIIDEN.EXE, and currently out of decompilation reach. But after some more long overdue cleaning work, TH01 has now passed both TH02 and even TH04 to become the second-most reverse-engineered game in all of ReC98, in terms of absolute numbers! 🎉

Also, PI for TH01's OP.EXE is imminent. Next up though, we've first got the probably final double-speed push for TH01, covering the last set of duplicated functions between the three binaries – quite fitting for the currently last fully funded, outstanding TH01 RE push. Then, we also might get FUUIN.EXE PI within the same push afterwards? After that, TH01 progress will be slowing down, since I'd then have to cover either the main menu or in-game code or the cutscenes, depending on what the backers request. (By default, it's going to be in-game code, of course.)