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Showing all posts tagged glitch-

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0111, P0112
Commits:
8b5c146...4ef4c9e, 4ef4c9e...e447a2d
💰 Funded by:
[Anonymous], Blue Bolt
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ player+ bomb+ boss+ ex-alice+ animation+ glitch- jank+

Only one newly ordered push since I've reopened the store? Great, that's all the justification I needed for the extended maintenance delay that was part of these two pushes 😛

Having to write comments to explain whether coordinates are relative to the top-left corner of the screen or the top-left corner of the playfield has finally become old. So, I introduced distinct types for all the coordinate systems we typically encounter, applying them to all code decompiled so far. Note how the planar nature of PC-98 VRAM meant that X and Y coordinates also had to be different from each other. On the X side, there's mainly the distinction between the [0; 640] screen space and the corresponding [0; 80] VRAM byte space. On the Y side, we also have the [0; 400] screen space, but the visible area of VRAM might be limited to [0; 200] when running in the PC-98's line-doubled 640×200 mode. A VRAM Y coordinate also always implies an added offset for vertical scrolling.
During all of the code reconstruction, these types can only have a documenting purpose. Turning them into anything more than just typedefs to int, in order to define conversion operators between them, simply won't recompile into identical binaries. Modding and porting projects, however, now have a nice foundation for doing just that, and can entirely lift coordinate system transformations into the type system, without having to proofread all the meaningless int declarations themselves.


So, what was left in terms of memory references? EX-Alice's fire waves were our final unknown entity that can collide with the player. Decently implemented, with little to say about them.

That left the bomb animation structures as the one big remaining PI blocker. They started out nice and simple in TH04, with a small 6-byte star animation structure used for both Reimu and Marisa. TH05, however, gave each character her own animation… and what the hell is going on with Reimu's blue stars there? Nope, not going to figure this out on ASM level.

A decompilation first required some more bomb-related variables to be named though. Since this was part of a generic RE push, it made sense to do this in all 5 games… which then led to nice PI gains in anything but TH05. :tannedcirno: Most notably, we now got the "pulling all items to player" flag in TH04 and TH05, which is actually separate from bombing. The obvious cheat mod is left as an exercise to the reader.


So, TH05 bomb animations. Just like the 📝 custom entity types of this game, all 4 characters share the same memory, with the superficially same 10-byte structure.
But let's just look at the very first field. Seen from a low level, it's a simple struct { int x, y; } pos, storing the current position of the character-specific bomb animation entity. But all 4 characters use this field differently:

  • For Reimu's blue stars, it's the top-left position of each star, in the 12.4 fixed-point format. But unlike the vast majority of these values in TH04 and TH05, it's relative to the top-left corner of the screen, not the playfield. Much better represented as struct { Subpixel screen_x, screen_y; } topleft.
  • For Marisa's lasers, it's the center of each circle, as a regular 12.4 fixed-point coordinate, relative to the top-left corner of the playfield. Much better represented as struct { Subpixel x, y; } center.
  • For Mima's shrinking circles, it's the center of each circle in regular pixel coordinates. Much better represented as struct { screen_x_t x; screen_y_t y; } center.
  • For Yuuka's spinning heart, it's the top-left corner in regular pixel coordinates. Much better represented as struct { screen_x_t x; screen_y_t y; } topleft.
    And yes, singular. The game is actually smart enough to only store a single heart, and then create the rest of the circle on the fly. (If it were even smarter, it wouldn't even use this structure member, but oh well.)
Therefore, I decompiled it as 4 separate structures once again, bundled into an union of arrays.

As for Reimu… yup, that's some pointer arithmetic straight out of Jigoku* for setting and updating the positions of the falling star trails. :zunpet: While that certainly required several comments to wrap my head around the current array positions, the one "bug" in all this arithmetic luckily has no effect on the game.
There is a small glitch with the growing circles, though. They are spawned at the end of the loop, with their position taken from the star pointer… but after that pointer has already been incremented. On the last loop iteration, this leads to an out-of-bounds structure access, with the position taken from some unknown EX-Alice data, which is 0 during most of the game. If you look at the animation, you can easily spot these bugged circles, consistently growing from the top-left corner (0, 0) of the playfield:


After all that, there was barely enough remaining time to filter out and label the final few memory references. But now, TH05's MAIN.EXE is technically position-independent! 🎉 -Tom- is going to work on a pretty extensive demo of this unprecedented level of efficient Touhou game modding. For a more impactful effect of both the 100% PI mark and that demo, I'll be delaying the push covering the remaining false positives in that binary until that demo is done. I've accumulated a pretty huge backlog of minor maintenance issues by now…
Next up though: The first part of the long-awaited build system improvements. I've finally come up with a way of sanely accelerating the 32-bit build part on most setups you could possibly want to build ReC98 on, without making the building experience worse for the other few setups.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0109
Commits:
dcf4e2c...2c7d86b
💰 Funded by:
[Anonymous], Blue Bolt
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ bullet+ micro-optimization+ glitch- uth05win+ tasm+

Back to TH05! Thanks to the good funding situation, I can strike a nice balance between getting TH05 position-independent as quickly as possible, and properly reverse-engineering some missing important parts of the game. Once 100% PI will get the attention of modders, the code will then be in better shape, and a bit more usable than if I just rushed that goal.

By now, I'm apparently also pretty spoiled by TH01's immediate decompilability, after having worked on that game for so long. Reverse-engineering in ASM land is pretty annoying, after all, since it basically boils down to meticulously editing a piece of ASM into something I can confidently call "reverse-engineered". Most of the time, simply decompiling that piece of code would take just a little bit longer, but be massively more useful. So, I immediately tried decompiling with TH05… and it just worked, at every place I tried!? Whatever the issue was that made 📝 segment splitting so annoying at my first attempt, I seem to have completely solved it in the meantime. 🤷 So yeah, backers can now request pretty much any part of TH04 and TH05 to be decompiled immediately, with no additional segment splitting cost.

(Protip for everyone interested in starting their own ReC project: Just declare one segment per function, right from the start, then group them together to restore the original code segmentation…)


Except that TH05 then just throws more of its infamous micro-optimized and undecompilable ASM at you. 🙄 This push covered the function that adjusts the bullet group template based on rank and the selected difficulty, called every time such a group is configured. Which, just like pretty much all of TH05's bullet spawning code, is one of those undecompilable functions. If C allowed labels of other functions as goto targets, it might have been decompilable into something useful to modders… maybe. But like this, there's no point in even trying.

This is such a terrible idea from a software architecture point of view, I can't even. Because now, you suddenly have to mirror your C++ declarations in ASM land, and keep them in sync with each other. I'm always happy when I get to delete an ASM declaration from the codebase once I've decompiled all the instances where it was referenced. But for TH05, we now have to keep those declarations around forever. 😕 And all that for a performance increase you probably couldn't even measure. Oh well, pulling off Galaxy Brain-level ASM optimizations is kind of fun if you don't have portability plans… I guess?

If I started a full fangame mod of a PC-98 Touhou game, I'd base it on TH04 rather than TH05, and backport selective features from TH05 as needed. Just because it was released later doesn't make it better, and this is by far not the only one of ZUN's micro-optimizations that just went way too far.

Dropping down to ASM also makes it easier to introduce weird quirks. Decompiled, one of TH05's tuning conditions for stack groups on Easy Mode would look something like:

case BP_STACK:
	// […]
	if(spread_angle_delta >= 2) {
		stack_bullet_count--;
	}
The fields of the bullet group template aren't typically reset when setting up a new group. So, spread_angle_delta in the context of a stack group effectively refers to "the delta angle of the last spread group that was fired before this stack – whenever that was". uth05win also spotted this quirk, considered it a bug, and wrote fanfiction by changing spread_angle_delta to stack_bullet_count.
As usual for functions that occur in more than one game, I also decompiled the TH04 bullet group tuning function, and it's perfectly sane, with no such quirks.


In the more PI-focused parts of this push, we got the TH05-exclusive smooth boss movement functions, for flying randomly or towards a given point. Pretty unspectacular for the most part, but we've got yet another uth05win inconsistency in the latter one. Once the Y coordinate gets close enough to the target point, it actually speeds up twice as much as the X coordinate would, whereas uth05win used the same speedup factors for both. This might make uth05win a couple of frames slower in all boss fights from Stage 3 on. Hard to measure though – and boss movement partly depends on RNG anyway.


Next up: Shinki's background animations – which are actually the single biggest source of position dependence left in TH05.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0067, P0068, P0069
Commits:
e55a48b...ebb30ce, ebb30ce...2ac00d4, e0d0dcd...0f18dbc
💰 Funded by:
Splashman, Yanga, [Anonymous]
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ pc98+ blitting+ glitch- boss+ mima-th01+ yuugenmagan+

Now that's more like the speed I was expecting! After a few more unused functions for palette fading and rectangle blitting, we've reached the big line drawing functions. And the biggest one among them, drawing a straight line at any angle between two points using Bresenham's algorithm, actually happens to be the single longest function present in more than one binary in all of PC-98 Touhou, and #23 on the list of individual longest functions.

And it technically has a ZUN bug! If you pass a point outside the (0, 0) - (639, 399) screen range, the function will calculate a new point at the edge of the screen, so that the resulting line will retain the angle intended by the points given. Except that it does so by calculating the line slope using an integer division rather than a floating-point one :zunpet: Doesn't seem like it actually causes any weirdly skewed lines to be drawn in-game, though; that case is only hit in the Mima boss fight, which draws a few lines with a bottom coordinate of 400 rather than the maximum of 399. It might also cause the wrong background pixels to be restored during parts of the YuugenMagan fight, leading to flickering sprites, but seriously, that's an issue everywhere you look in this game.

Together with the rendering-text-to-VRAM function we've mostly already known from TH02, this pushed the total RE percentage well over 20%, and almost doubled the TH01 RE percentage, all within three pushes. And comparatively, it went really smoothly, to the point (ha) where I even had enough time left to also include the single-point functions that come next in that code segment. Since about half of the remaining functions in OP.EXE are present in more than just itself, I'll be able to at least keep up this speed until OP.EXE hits the 70% RE mark. That is, as long as the backers' priorities continue to be generic RE or "giving some love to TH01"… we don't have a precedent for TH01's actual game code yet.

And that's all the TH01 progress funded for January! Next up, we actually do have a focus on TH03's game and scoring mechanics… or at least the foundation for that.