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📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0190, P0191, P0192
Commits:
5734815...293e16a, 293e16a...71cb7b5, 71cb7b5...e1f3f9f
💰 Funded by:
nrook, -Tom-, [Anonymous]
🏷 Tags:
rec98 th02 th03 th04 th05 gameplay boss shinki danmaku-pattern midboss master.lib file-format tcc pc98 micro-optimization

The important things first:

So, Shinki! As far as final boss code is concerned, she's surprisingly economical, with 📝 her background animations making up more than ⅓ of her entire code. Going straight from TH01's 📝 final 📝 bosses to TH05's final boss definitely showed how much ZUN had streamlined danmaku pattern code by the end of PC-98 Touhou. Don't get me wrong, there is still room for improvement: TH05 not only 📝 reuses the same 16 bytes of generic boss state we saw in TH04 last month, but also uses them 4× as often, and even for midbosses. Most importantly though, defining danmaku patterns using a single global instance of the group template structure is just bad no matter how you look at it:

Declaring a separate structure instance with the static data for every pattern would be both safer and more space-efficient, and there's more than enough space left for that in the game's data segment.
But all in all, the pattern functions are short, sweet, and easy to follow. The "devil" pattern is significantly more complex than the others, but still far from TH01's final bosses at their worst. I especially like the clear architectural separation between "one-shot pattern" functions that return true once they're done, and "looping pattern" functions that run as long as they're being called from a boss's main function. Not many all too interesting things in these pattern functions for the most part, except for two pieces of evidence that Shinki was coded after Yumeko:


Speaking about that wing sprite: If you look at ST05.BB2 (or any other file with a large sprite, for that matter), you notice a rather weird file layout:

And it's not a limitation of the sprite width field in the BFNT+ header either. Instead, it's master.lib's BFNT functions which are limited to sprite widths up to 64 pixels… or at least that's what MASTER.MAN claims. Whatever the restriction was, it seems to be completely nonexistent as of master.lib version 0.23, and none of the master.lib functions used by the games have any issues with larger sprites.
Since ZUN stuck to the supposed 64-pixel width limit though, it's now the game that expects Shinki's winged form to consist of 4 physical sprites, not just 1. Any conversion from another, more logical sprite sheet layout back into BFNT+ must therefore replicate the original number of sprites. Otherwise, the sequential IDs ("patnums") assigned to every newly loaded sprite no longer match ZUN's hardcoded IDs, causing the game to crash. This is exactly what used to happen with -Tom-'s MysticTK automation scripts, which combined these exact sprites into a single large one. This issue has now been fixed – just in case there are some underground modders out there who used these scripts and wonder why their game crashed as soon as the Shinki fight started.


And then the code quality takes a nosedive with Shinki's main function. :onricdennat: Even in TH05, these boss and midboss update functions are still very imperative:

The biggest WTF in there, however, goes to using one of the 16 state bytes as a "relative phase" variable for differentiating between boss phases that share the same branch within the switch(boss.phase) statement. While it's commendable that ZUN tried to reduce code duplication for once, he could have just branched depending on the actual boss.phase variable? The same state byte is then reused in the "devil" pattern to track the activity state of the big jerky lasers in the second half of the pattern. If you somehow managed to end the phase after the first few bullets of the pattern, but before these lasers are up, Shinki's update function would think that you're still in the phase before the "devil" pattern. The main function then sequence-breaks right to the defeat phase, skipping the final pattern with the burning Makai background. Luckily, the HP boundaries are far away enough to make this impossible.
The takeaway here: If you want to use the state bytes for your custom boss script mods, alias them to your own 16-byte structure, and limit each of the bytes to a clearly defined meaning across your entire boss script.

One final discovery that doesn't seem to be documented anywhere yet: Shinki actually has a hidden bomb shield during her two purple-wing phases. uth05win got this part slightly wrong though: It's not a complete shield, and hitting Shinki will still deal 1 point of chip damage per frame. For comparison, the first phase lasts for 3,000 HP, and the "devil" pattern phase lasts for 5,800 HP.

And there we go, 3rd PC-98 Touhou boss script* decompiled, 28 to go! 🎉 In case you were expecting a fix for the Shinki death glitch: That one is more appropriately fixed as part of the Mai & Yuki script. It also requires new code, should ideally look a bit prettier than just removing cheetos between one frame and the next, and I'd still like it to fit within the original position-dependent code layout… Let's do that some other time.
Not much to say about the Stage 1 midboss, or midbosses in general even, except that their update functions have to imperatively handle even more subsystems, due to the relative lack of helper functions.


The remaining ¾ of the third push went to a bunch of smaller RE and finalization work that would have hardly got any attention otherwise, to help secure that 50% RE mark. The nicest piece of code in there shows off what looks like the optimal way of setting up the 📝 GRCG tile register for monochrome blitting in a variable color:

mov ah, palette_index ; Any other non-AL 8-bit register works too.
                      ; (x86 only supports AL as the source operand for OUTs.)

rept 4                ; For all 4 bitplanes…
    shr ah,  1        ; Shift the next color bit into the x86 carry flag
    sbb al,  al       ; Extend the carry flag to a full byte
                      ; (CF=0 → 0x00, CF=1 → 0xFF)
    out 7Eh, al       ; Write AL to the GRCG tile register
endm

Thanks to Turbo C++'s inlining capabilities, the loop body even decompiles into a surprisingly nice one-liner. What a beautiful micro-optimization, at a place where micro-optimization doesn't hurt and is almost expected.
Unfortunately, the micro-optimizations went all downhill from there, becoming increasingly dumb and undecompilable. Was it really necessary to save 4 x86 instructions in the highly unlikely case of a new spark sprite being spawned outside the playfield? That one 2D polar→Cartesian conversion function then pointed out Turbo C++ 4.0J's woefully limited support for 32-bit micro-optimizations. The code generation for 32-bit 📝 pseudo-registers is so bad that they almost aren't worth using for arithmetic operations, and the inline assembler just flat out doesn't support anything 32-bit. No use in decompiling a function that you'd have to entirely spell out in machine code, especially if the same function already exists in multiple other, more idiomatic C++ variations.
Rounding out the third push, we got the TH04/TH05 DEMO?.REC replay file reading code, which should finally prove that nothing about the game's original replay system could serve as even just the foundation for community-usable replays. Just in case anyone was still thinking that.


Next up: Back to TH01, with the Elis fight! Got a bit of room left in the cap again, and there are a lot of things that would make a lot of sense now: