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📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0212, P0213
Commits:
d398a94...363fd54, 363fd54...158a91e
💰 Funded by:
LeyDud, Lmocinemod, GhostRiderCog, Ember2528
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ score- pc98+ performance+ unused+ cutscene+ debug+

Wow, it's been 3 days and I'm already back with an unexpectedly long post about TH01's bonus point screens? 3 days used to take much longer in my previous projects…

Before I talk about graphics for the rest of this post, let's start with the exact calculations for both bonuses. Touhou Wiki already got these right, but it still makes sense to provide them here, in a format that allows you to cross-reference them with the source code more easily. For the card-flipping stage bonus:

Time min((Stage timer * 3), 6553)
Continuous min((Highest card combo * 100), 6553)
Bomb&Player min(((Lives * 200) + (Bombs * 100)), 6553)
STAGE min(((Stage number - 1) * 200), 6553)
BONUS Point Sum of all above values * 10

The boss stage bonus is calculated from the exact same metrics, despite half of them being labeled differently. The only actual differences are in the higher multipliers and in the cap for the stage number bonus. Why remove it if raising it high enough also effectively disables it? :tannedcirno:

Time min((Stage timer * 5), 6553)
Continuous min((Highest card combo * 200), 6553)
MIKOsan min(((Lives * 500) + (Bombs * 200)), 6553)
Clear min((Stage number * 1000), 65530)
TOTLE Sum of all above values * 10

The transition between the gameplay and TOTLE screens is one of the more impressive effects showcased in this game, especially due to how wavy it often tends to look. Aside from the palette interpolation (which is, by the way, the first time ZUN wrote a correct interpolation algorithm between two 4-bit palettes), the core of the effect is quite simple. With the TOTLE image blitted to VRAM page 1:

So it's really more like two interlaced shift effects with opposite directions, starting on different scanlines. No trigonometry involved at all.

Horizontally scrolling pixels on a single VRAM page remains one of the few 📝 appropriate uses of the EGC in a fullscreen 640×400 PC-98 game, regardless of the copied block size. The few inter-page copies in this effect are also reasonable: With 8 new lines starting on each effect frame, up to (8 × 20) = 160 lines are transferred at any given time, resulting in a maximum of (160 × 2 × 2) = 640 VRAM page switches per frame for the newly transferred pixels. Not that frame rate matters in this situation to begin with though, as the game is doing nothing else while playing this effect.
What does sort of matter: Why 32 pixels every 2 frames, instead of 16 pixels on every frame? There's no performance difference between doing one half of the work in one frame, or two halves of the work in two frames. It's not like the overhead of another loop has a serious impact here, especially with the PC-98 VRAM being said to have rather high latencies. 32 pixels over 2 frames is also harder to code, so ZUN must have done it on purpose. Guess he really wanted to go for that 📽 cinematic 30 FPS look 📽 here… :zunpet:

Removing the palette interpolation and transitioning from a black screen to CLEAR3.GRP makes it a lot clearer how the effect works.

Once all the metrics have been calculated, ZUN animates each value with a rather fancy left-to-right typing effect. As 16×16 images that use a single bright-red color, these numbers would be perfect candidates for gaiji… except that ZUN wanted to render them at the more natural Y positions of the labels inside CLEAR3.GRP that are far from aligned to the 8×16 text RAM grid. Not having been in the mood for hardcoding another set of monochrome sprites as C arrays that day, ZUN made the still reasonable choice of storing the image data for these numbers in the single-color .GRC form– yeah, no, of course he once again chose the .PTN hammer, and its 📝 16×16 "quarter" wrapper functions around nominal 32×32 sprites.

.PTN sprite for the TOTLE metric digits of 0, 1, 2, and 3.PTN sprite for the TOTLE metric digits of 4, 5, 6, and 7 .PTN sprite for the TOTLE metric digits of 8 and 9, filled with two blank quarters
The three 32×32 TOTLE metric digit sprites inside NUMB.PTN.

Why do I bring up such a detail? What's actually going on there is that ZUN loops through and blits each digit from 0 to 9, and then continues the loop with "digit" numbers from 10 to 19, stopping before the number whose ones digit equals the one that should stay on screen. No problem with that in theory, and the .PTN sprite selection is correct… but the .PTN quarter selection isn't, as ZUN wrote (digit % 4) instead of the correct ((digit % 10) % 4). :onricdennat: Since .PTN quarters are indexed in a row-major way, the 10-19 part of the loop thus ends up blitting 23016745(nothing):

This footage was slowed down to show one sprite blitting operation per frame. The actual game waits a hardcoded 4 milliseconds between each sprite, so even theoretically, you would only see roughly every 4th digit. And yes, here's a frame with the empty quarter, only blitted if one of the digits is a 9.

Seriously though? If the deadline is looming and you've got to rush some part of your game, a standalone screen that doesn't affect anything is the best place to pick. At 4 milliseconds per digit, the animation goes by so fast that this quirk might even add to its perceived fanciness. It's exactly the reason why I've always been rather careful with labeling such quirks as "bugs". And in the end, the code does perform one more blitting call after the loop to make sure that the correct digit remains on screen.


The remaining ¾ of the second push went towards transferring the final data definitions from ASM to C land. Most of the details there paint a rather depressing picture about ZUN's original code layout and the bloat that came with it, but it did end on a real highlight. There was some unused data between ZUN's non-master.lib VSync and text RAM code that I just moved away in September 2015 without taking a closer look at it. Those bytes kind of look like another hardcoded 1bpp image though… wait, what?!

An unused mouse cursor sprite found in all of TH01's binaries

Lovely! With no mouse-related code left in the game otherwise, this cursor sprite provides some great fuel for wild fan theories about TH01's development history:

  1. Could ZUN have 📝 stolen the basic PC-98 VSync or text RAM function code from a source that also implemented mouse support?
  2. Did he have a mouse-controlled level editor during development? It's highly likely that he had something, given all the 📝 bit twiddling seen in the STAGE?.DAT format.
  3. Or was this game actually meant to have mouse-controllable portions at some point during development? Even if it would have just been the menus.

… Actually, you know what, with all shared data moved to C land, I might as well finish FUUIN.EXE right now. The last secret hidden in its main() function: Just like GAME.BAT supports launching the game in a debug mode from the DOS command line, FUUIN.EXE can directly launch one of the game's endings. As long as the MDRV2 driver is installed, you can enter fuuin t1 for the 魔界/Makai Good Ending, or fuuin t for 地獄/Jigoku Good Ending.
Unfortunately, the command-line parameter can only control the route. Choosing between a Good or Bad Ending is still done exclusively through TH01's resident structure, and the continues_per_scene array in particular. But if you pre-allocate that structure somehow and set one of the members to a nonzero value, it would work. Trainers, anyone?

Alright, gotta get back to the code if I want to have any chance of finishing this game before the 15th… Next up: The final 17 functions in REIIDEN.EXE that tie everything together and add some more debug features on top.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0193, P0194, P0195, P0196, P0197
Commits:
e1f3f9f...183d7a2, 183d7a2...5d93a50, 5d93a50...e18c53d, e18c53d...57c9ac5, 57c9ac5...48db0b7
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528, Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ gameplay+ boss+ elis+ mima-th01+ rng+ danmaku-pattern+ bug+ jank+ glitch+ unused+ pc98+ blitting+ mod+ score-

With Elis, we've not only reached the midway point in TH01's boss code, but also a bunch of other milestones: Both REIIDEN.EXE and TH01 as a whole have crossed the 75% RE mark, and overall position independence has also finally cracked 80%!

And it got done in 4 pushes again? Yup, we're back to 📝 Konngara levels of redundancy and copy-pasta. This time, it didn't even stop at the big copy-pasted code blocks for the rift sprite and 256-pixel circle animations, with the words "redundant" and "unnecessary" ending up a total of 18 times in my source code comments.
But damn is this fight broken. As usual with TH01 bosses, let's start with a high-level overview:

This puts the earliest possible end of the fight at the first frame of phase 5. However, nothing prevents Elis' HP from reaching 0 before that point. You can nicely see this in 📝 debug mode: Wait until the HP bar has filled up to avoid heap corruption, hold ↵ Return to reduce her HP to 0, and watch how Elis still goes through a total of two patterns* and four teleport animations before accepting defeat.

But wait, heap corruption? Yup, there's a bug in the HP bar that already affected Konngara as well, and it isn't even just about the graphical glitches generated by negative HP:

Since Elis starts with 14 HP, which is an even number, this corruption is trivial to cause: Simply hold ↵ Return from the beginning of the fight, and the completion condition will never be true, as the HP and frame numbers run past the off-by-one meeting point.

Regular gameplay, however, entirely prevents this due to the fixed start positions of Reimu and the Orb, the Orb's fixed initial trajectory, and the 50 frames of delay until a bomb deals damage to a boss. These aspects make it impossible to hit Elis within the first 14 frames of phase 1, and ensure that her HP bar is always filled up completely. So ultimately, this bug ends up comparable in seriousness to the 📝 recursion / stack overflow bug in the memory info screen.


These wavy teleport animations point to a quite frustrating architectural issue in this fight. It's not even the fact that unblitting the yellow star sprites rips temporary holes into Elis' sprite; that's almost expected from TH01 at this point. Instead, it's all because of this unused frame of the animation:

An unused wave animation frame from TH01's BOSS5.BOS

With this sprite still being part of BOSS5.BOS, Girl-Elis has a total of 9 animation frames, 1 more than the 📝 8 per-entity sprites allowed by ZUN's architecture. The quick and easy solution would have been to simply bump the sprite array size by 1, but… nah, this would have added another 20 bytes to all 6 of the .BOS image slots. :zunpet: Instead, ZUN wrote the manual position synchronization code I mentioned in that 2020 blog post. Ironically, he then copy-pasted this snippet of code often enough that it ended up taking up more than 120 bytes in the Elis fight alone – with, you guessed it, some of those copies being redundant. Not to mention that just going from 8 to 9 sprites would have allowed ZUN to go down from 6 .BOS image slots to 3. That would have actually saved 420 bytes in addition to the manual synchronization trouble. Looking forward to SinGyoku, that's going to be fun again…


As for the fight itself, it doesn't take long until we reach its most janky danmaku pattern, right in phase 1:

The "pellets along circle" pattern on Lunatic, in its original version and with fanfiction fixes for everything that can potentially be interpreted as a bug.

Then again, it might very well be that all of this was intended, or, most likely, just left in the game as a happy accident. The latter interpretation would explain why ZUN didn't just delete the rendering calls for the lower-right quarter of the circle, because seriously, how would you not spot that? The phase 3 patterns continue with more minor graphical glitches that aren't even worth talking about anymore.


And then Elis transforms into her bat form at the beginning of Phase 5, which displays some rather unique hitboxes. The one against the Orb is fine, but the one against player shots…

… uses the bat's X coordinate for both X and Y dimensions. :zunpet: In regular gameplay, it's not too bad as most of the bat patterns fire aimed pellets which typically don't allow you to move below her sprite to begin with. But if you ever tried destroying these pellets while standing near the middle of the playfield, now you know why that didn't work. This video also nicely points out how the bat, like any boss sprite, is only ever blitted at positions on the 8×1-pixel VRAM byte grid, while collision detection uses the actual pixel position.

The bat form patterns are all relatively simple, with little variation depending on the difficulty level, except for the "slow pellet spreads" pattern. This one is almost easiest to dodge on Lunatic, where the 5-spreads are not only always fired downwards, but also at the hardcoded narrow delta angle, leaving plenty of room for the player to move out of the way:

The "slow pellet spreads" pattern of Elis' bat form, on . Which version do you think is the easiest one?

Finally, we've got another potential timesave in the girl form's "safety circle" pattern:

After the circle spawned completely, you lose a life by moving outside it, but doing that immediately advances the pattern past the circle part. This part takes 200 frames, but the defeat animation only takes 82 frames, so you can save up to 118 frames there.

Final funny tidbit: As with all dynamic entities, this circle is only blitted to VRAM page 0 to allow easy unblitting. However, it's also kind of static, and there needs to be some way to keep the Orb, the player shots, and the pellets from ripping holes into it. So, ZUN just re-blits the circle every… 4 frames?! 🤪 The same is true for the Star of David and its surrounding circle, but there you at least get a flash animation to justify it. All the overlap is actually quite a good reason for not even attempting to 📝 mess with the hardware color palette instead.


And that's the 4th PC-98 Touhou boss decompiled, 27 to go… but wait, all these quirks, and I still got nothing about the one actual crash that can appear in regular gameplay? There has even been a recent video about it. The cause has to be in Elis' main function, after entering the defeat branch and before the blocking white-out animation. It can't be anywhere else other than in the 📝 central line blitting and unblitting function, called from 📝 that one broken laser reset+unblit function, because everything else in that branch looks fine… and I think we can rule out a crash in MDRV2's non-blocking fade-out call. That's going to need some extra research, and a 5th push added on top of this delivery.

Reproducing the crash was the whole challenge here. Even after moving Elis and Reimu to the exact positions seen in Pearl's video and setting Elis' HP to 0 on the exact same frame, everything ran fine for me. It's definitely no division by 0 this time, the function perfectly guards against that possibility. The line specified in the function's parameters is always clipped to the VRAM region as well, so we can also rule out illegal memory accesses here…

… or can we? Stepping through it all reminded me of how this function brings unblitting sloppiness to the next level: For each VRAM byte touched, ZUN actually unblits the 4 surrounding bytes, adding one byte to the left and two bytes to the right, and using a single 32-bit read and write per bitplane. So what happens if the function tries to unblit the topmost byte of VRAM, covering the pixel positions from (0, 0) to (7, 0) inclusive? The VRAM offset of 0x0000 is decremented to 0xFFFF to cover the one byte to the left, 4 bytes are written to this address, the CPU's internal offset overflows… and as it turns out, that is illegal even in Real Mode as of the 80286, and will raise a General Protection Fault. Which is… ignored by DOSBox-X, every Neko Project II version in common use, the CSCP emulators, SL9821, and T98-Next. Only Anex86 accurately emulates the behavior of real hardware here.

OK, but no laser fired by Elis ever reaches the top-left corner of the screen. How can such a fault even happen in practice? That's where the broken laser reset+unblit function comes in: Not only does it just flat out pass the wrong parameters to the line unblitting function – describing the line already traveled by the laser and stopping where the laser begins – but it also passes them wrongly, in the form of raw 32-bit fixed-point Q24.8 values, with no conversion other than a truncation to the signed 16-bit pixels expected by the function. What then follows is an attempt at interpolation and clipping to find a line segment between those garbage coordinates that actually falls within the boundaries of VRAM:

  1. right/bottom correspond to a laser's origin position, and left/top to the leftmost pixel of its moved-out top line. The bug therefore only occurs with lasers that stopped growing and have started moving.
  2. Moreover, it will only happen if either (left % 256) or (right % 256) is ≤ 127 and the other one of the two is ≥ 128. The typecast to signed 16-bit integers then turns the former into a large positive value and the latter into a large negative value, triggering the function's clipping code.
  3. The function then follows Bresenham's algorithm: left is ensured to be smaller than right by swapping the two values if necessary. If that happened, top and bottom are also swapped, regardless of their value – the algorithm does not care about their order.
  4. The slope in the X dimension is calculated using an integer division of ((bottom - top) / (right - left)). Both subtractions are done on signed 16-bit integers, and overflow accordingly.
  5. (-left × slope_x) is added to top, and left is set to 0.
  6. If both top and bottom are < 0 or ≥ 640, there's nothing to be unblitted. Otherwise, the final coordinates are clipped to the VRAM range of [(0, 0), (639, 399)].
  7. If the function got this far, the line to be unblitted is now very likely to reach from
    1. the top-left to the bottom-right corner, starting out at (0, 0) right away, or
    2. from the bottom-left corner to the top-right corner. In this case, you'd expect unblitting to end at (639, 0), but thanks to an off-by-one error, it actually ends at (640, -1), which is equivalent to (0, 0). Why add clipping to VRAM offset calculations when everything else is clipped already, right? :godzun:
Possible laser states that will cause the fault, with some debug output to help understand the cause, and any pellets removed for better readability. This can happen for all bosses that can potentially have shootout lasers on screen when being defeated, so it also applies to Mima. Fixing this is easier than understanding why it happens, but since y'all love reading this stuff…

tl;dr: TH01 has a high chance of freezing at a boss defeat sequence if there are diagonally moving lasers on screen, and if your PC-98 system raises a General Protection Fault on a 4-byte write to offset 0xFFFF, and if you don't run a TSR with an INT 0Dh handler that might handle this fault differently.

The easiest fix option would be to just remove the attempted laser unblitting entirely, but that would also have an impact on this game's… distinctive visual glitches, in addition to touching a whole lot of code bytes. If I ever get funded to work on a hypothetical TH01 Anniversary Edition that completely rearchitects the game to fix all these glitches, it would be appropriate there, but not for something that purports to be the original game.

(Sidenote to further hype up this Anniversary Edition idea for PC-98 hardware owners: With the amount of performance left on the table at every corner of this game, I'm pretty confident that we can get it to work decently on PC-98 models with just an 80286 CPU.)

Since we're in critical infrastructure territory once again, I went for the most conservative fix with the least impact on the binary: Simply changing any VRAM offsets >= 0xFFFD to 0x0000 to avoid the GPF, and leave all other bugs in place. Sure, it's rather lazy and "incorrect"; the function still unblits a 32-pixel block there, but adding a special case for blitting 24 pixels would add way too much code. And seriously, it's not like anything happens in the 8 pixels between (24, 0) and (31, 0) inclusive during gameplay to begin with. To balance out the additional per-row if() branch, I inlined the VRAM page change I/O, saving two function calls and one memory write per unblitted row.

That means it's time for a new community_choice_fixes build, containing the new definitive bugfixed versions of these games: 2022-05-31-community-choice-fixes.zip Check the th01_critical_fixes branch for the modified TH01 code. It also contains a fix for the HP bar heap corruption in debug mode – simply changing the == comparison to <= is enough to avoid it, and negative HP will still create aesthetic glitch art.


Once again, I then was left with ½ of a push, which I finally filled with some FUUIN.EXE code, specifically the verdict screen. The most interesting part here is the player title calculation, which is quite sneaky: There are only 6 skill levels, but three groups of titles for each level, and the title you'll see is picked from a random group. It looks like this is the first time anyone has documented the calculation?
As for the levels, ZUN definitely didn't expect players to do particularly well. With a 1cc being the standard goal for completing a Touhou game, it's especially funny how TH01 expects you to continue a lot: The code has branches for up to 21 continues, and the on-screen table explicitly leaves room for 3 digits worth of continues per 5-stage scene. Heck, these counts are even stored in 32-bit long variables.

Next up: 📝 Finally finishing the long overdue Touhou Patch Center MediaWiki update work, while continuing with Kikuri in the meantime. Originally I wasn't sure about what to do between Elis and Seihou, but with Ember2528's surprise contribution last week, y'all have demonstrated more than enough interest in the idea of getting TH01 done sooner rather than later. And I agree – after all, we've got the 25th anniversary of its first public release coming up on August 15, and I might still manage to completely decompile this game by that point…

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0186, P0187, P0188
Commits:
a21ab3d...bab5634, bab5634...426a531, 426a531...e881f95
💰 Funded by:
Blue Bolt, [Anonymous], nrook
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ boss+ portability+ tcc+ master.lib+ bug+ marisa-4+ gengetsu+ score-

Did you know that moving on top of a boss sprite doesn't kill the player in TH04, only in TH05?

Screenshot of Reimu moving on top of Stage 6 Yuuka, demonstrating the lack of boss↔player collision in TH04
Yup, Reimu is not getting hit… yet.

That's the first of only three interesting discoveries in these 3 pushes, all of which concern TH04. But yeah, 3 for something as seemingly simple as these shared boss functions… that's still not quite the speed-up I had hoped for. While most of this can be blamed, again, on TH04 and all of its hardcoded complexities, there still was a lot of work to be done on the maintenance front as well. These functions reference a bunch of code I RE'd years ago and that still had to be brought up to current standards, with the dependencies reaching from 📝 boss explosions over 📝 text RAM overlay functionality up to in-game dialog loading.

The latter provides a good opportunity to talk a bit about x86 memory segmentation. Many aspiring PC-98 developers these days are very scared of it, with some even going as far as to rather mess with Protected Mode and DOS extenders just so that they don't have to deal with it. I wonder where that fear comes from… Could it be because every modern programming language I know of assumes memory to be flat, and lacks any standard language-level features to even express something like segments and offsets? That's why compilers have a hard time targeting 16-bit x86 these days: Doing anything interesting on the architecture requires giving the programmer full control over segmentation, which always comes down to adding the typical non-standard language extensions of compilers from back in the day. And as soon as DOS stopped being used, these extensions no longer made sense and were subsequently removed from newer tools. A good example for this can be found in an old version of the NASM manual: The project started as an attempt to make x86 assemblers simple again by throwing out most of the segmentation features from MASM-style assemblers, which made complete sense in 1996 when 16-bit DOS and Windows were already on their way out. But there was a point to all those features, and that's why ReC98 still has to use the supposedly inferior TASM.

Not that this fear of segmentation is completely unfounded: All the segmentation-related keywords, directives, and #pragmas provided by Borland C++ and TASM absolutely can be the cause of many weird runtime bugs. Even if the compiler or linker catches them, you are often left with confusing error messages that aged just as poorly as memory segmentation itself.
However, embracing the concept does provide quite the opportunity for optimizations. While it definitely was a very crazy idea, there is a small bit of brilliance to be gained from making proper use of all these segmentation features. Case in point: The buffer for the in-game dialog scripts in TH04 and TH05.

// Thanks to the semantics of `far` pointers, we only need a single 32-bit
// pointer variable for the following code.
extern unsigned char far *dialog_p;

// This master.lib function returns a `void __seg *`, which is a 16-bit
// segment-only pointer. Converting to a `far *` yields a full segment:offset
// pointer to offset 0000h of that segment.
dialog_p = (unsigned char far *)hmem_allocbyte(/* … */);

// Running the dialog script involves pointer arithmetic. On a far pointer,
// this only affects the 16-bit offset part, complete with overflow at 64 KiB,
// from FFFFh back to 0000h.
dialog_p += /* … */;
dialog_p += /* … */;
dialog_p += /* … */;

// Since the segment part of the pointer is still identical to the one we
// allocated above, we can later correctly free the buffer by pulling the
// segment back out of the pointer.
hmem_free((void __seg *)dialog_p);

If dialog_p was a huge pointer, any pointer arithmetic would have also adjusted the segment part, requiring a second pointer to store the base address for the hmem_free call. Doing that will also be necessary for any port to a flat memory model. Depending on how you look at it, this compression of two logical pointers into a single variable is either quite nice, or really, really dumb in its reliance on the precise memory model of one single architecture. :tannedcirno:


Why look at dialog loading though, wasn't this supposed to be all about shared boss functions? Well, TH04 unnecessarily puts certain stage-specific code into the boss defeat function, such as loading the alternate Stage 5 Yuuka defeat dialog before a Bad Ending, or initializing Gengetsu after Mugetsu's defeat in the Extra Stage.
That's TH04's second core function with an explicit conditional branch for Gengetsu, after the 📝 dialog exit code we found last year during EMS research. And I've heard people say that Shinki was the most hardcoded fight in PC-98 Touhou… Really, Shinki is a perfectly regular boss, who makes proper use of all internal mechanics in the way they were intended, and doesn't blast holes into the architecture of the game. Even within TH05, it's Mai and Yuki who rely on hacks and duplicated code, not Shinki.

The worst part about this though? How the function distinguishes Mugetsu from Gengetsu. Once again, it uses its own global variable to track whether it is called the first or the second time within TH04's Extra Stage, unrelated to the same variable used in the dialog exit function. But this time, it's not just any newly created, single-use variable, oh no. In a misguided attempt to micro-optimize away a few bytes of conventional memory, TH04 reserves 16 bytes of "generic boss state", which can (and are) freely used for anything a boss doesn't want to store in a more dedicated variable.
It might have been worth it if the bosses actually used most of these 16 bytes, but the majority just use (the same) two, with only Stage 4 Reimu using a whopping seven different ones. To reverse-engineer the various uses of these variables, I pretty much had to map out which of the undecompiled danmaku-pattern functions corresponds to which boss fight. In the end, I assigned 29 different variable names for each of the semantically different use cases, which made up another full push on its own.

Now, 16 bytes of wildly shared state, isn't that the perfect recipe for bugs? At least during this cursory look, I haven't found any obvious ones yet. If they do exist, it's more likely that they involve reused state from earlier bosses – just how the Shinki death glitch in TH05 is caused by reusing cheeto data from way back in Stage 4 – and hence require much more boss-specific progress.
And yes, it might have been way too early to look into all these tiny details of specific boss scripts… but then, this happened:

TH04 crashing to the DOS prompt in the Stage 4 Marisa fight, right as the last of her bits is destroyed

Looks similar to another screenshot of a crash in the same fight that was reported in December, doesn't it? I was too much in a hurry to figure it out exactly, but notice how both crashes happen right as the last of Marisa's four bits is destroyed. KirbyComment has suspected this to be the cause for a while, and now I can pretty much confirm it to be an unguarded division by the number of on-screen bits in Marisa-specific pattern code. But what's the cause for Kurumi then? :thonk:
As for fixing it, I can go for either a fast or a slow option:

  1. Superficially fixing only this crash will probably just take a fraction of a push.
  2. But I could also go for a deeper understanding by looking at TH04's version of the 📝 custom entity structure. It not only stores the data of Marisa's bits, but is also very likely to be involved in Kurumi's crash, and would get TH04 a lot closer to 100% PI. Taking that look will probably need at least 2 pushes, and might require another 3-4 to completely decompile Marisa's fight, and 2-3 to decompile Kurumi's.

OK, now that that's out of the way, time to finish the boss defeat function… but not without stumbling over the third of TH04's quirks, relating to the Clear Bonus for the main game or the Extra Stage:

And after another few collision-related functions, we're now truly, finally ready to decompile bosses in both TH04 and TH05! Just as the anything funds were running out… :onricdennat: The remaining ¼ of the third push then went to Shinki's 32×32 ball bullets, rounding out this delivery with a small self-contained piece of the first TH05 boss we're probably going to look at.

Next up, though: I'm not sure, actually. Both Shinki and Elis seem just a little bit larger than the 2¼ or 4 pushes purchased so far, respectively. Now that there's a bunch of room left in the cap again, I'll just let the next contribution decide – with a preference for Shinki in case of a tie. And if it will take longer than usual for the store to sell out again this time (heh), there's still the 📝 PC-98 text RAM JIS trail word rendering research waiting to be documented.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0172, P0173
Commits:
49e6789...2d5491e, 2d5491e...27f901c
💰 Funded by:
Blue Bolt, [Anonymous]
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th03+ file-format+ menu+ score- blitting+ glitch+

TH03 finally passed 20% RE, and the newly decompiled code contains no serious ZUN bugs! What a nice way to end the year.

There's only a single unlockable feature in TH03: Chiyuri and Yumemi as playable characters, unlocked after a 1CC on any difficulty. Just like the Extra Stages in TH04 and TH05, YUME.NEM contains a single designated variable for this unlocked feature, making it trivial to craft a fully unlocked score file without recording any high scores that others would have to compete against. So, we can now put together a complete set for all PC-98 Touhou games: 2021-12-27-Fully-unlocked-clean-score-files.zip It would have been cool to set the randomly generated encryption keys in these files to a fixed value so that they cancel out and end up not actually encrypting the file. Too bad that TH03 also started feeding each encrypted byte back into its stream cipher, which makes this impossible.

The main loading and saving code turned out to be the second-cleanest implementation of a score file format in PC-98 Touhou, just behind TH02. Only two of the YUME.NEM functions come with nonsensical differences between OP.EXE and MAINL.EXE, rather than 📝 all of them, as in TH01 or 📝 too many of them, as in TH04 and TH05. As for the rest of the per-difficulty structure though… well, it quickly becomes clear why this was the final score file format to be RE'd. The name, score, and stage fields are directly stored in terms of the internal REGI*.BFT sprite IDs used on the high score screen. TH03 also stores 10 score digits for each place rather than the 9 possible ones, keeps any leading 0 digits, and stores the letters of entered names in reverse order… yeah, let's decompile the high score screen as well, for a full understanding of why ZUN might have done all that. (Answer: For no reason at all. :zunpet:)


And wow, what a breath of fresh air. It's surely not good-code: The overlapping shadows resulting from using a 24-pixel letterspacing with 32-pixel glyphs in the name column led ZUN to do quite a lot of unnecessary and slightly confusing rendering work when moving the cursor back and forth, and he even forgot about the EGC there. But it's nowhere close to the level of jank we saw in 📝 TH01's high score menu last year. Good to see that ZUN had learned a thing or two by his third game – especially when it comes to storing the character map cursor in terms of a character ID, and improving the layout of the character map:

The alphabet available for TH03 high score names.

That's almost a nicely regular grid there. With the question mark and the double-wide SP, BS, and END options, the cursor movement code only comes with a reasonable two exceptions, which are easily handled. And while I didn't get this screen completely decompiled, one additional push was enough to cover all important code there.

The only potential glitch on this screen is a result of ZUN's continued use of binary-coded decimal digits without any bounds check or cap. Like the in-game HUD score display in TH04 and TH05, TH03's high score screen simply uses the next glyph in the character set for the most significant digit of any score above 1,000,000,000 points – in this case, the period. Still, it only really gets bad at 8,000,000,000 points: Once the glyphs are exhausted, the blitting function ends up accessing garbage data and filling the entire screen with garbage pixels. For comparison though, the current world record is 133,650,710 points, so good luck getting 8 billion in the first place.

Next up: Starting 2022 with the long-awaited decompilation of TH01's Sariel fight! Due to the 📝 recent price increase, we now got a window in the cap that is going to remain open until tomorrow, providing an early opportunity to set a new priority after Sariel is done.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0158, P0159
Commits:
bf7bb7e...c0c0ebc, c0c0ebc...e491cd7
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ gameplay+ card-flipping+ rng+ score- bomb+ animation+ jank+ waste+

Of course, Sariel's potentially bloated and copy-pasted code is blocked by even more definitely bloated and copy-pasted code. It's TH01, what did you expect? :tannedcirno:

But even then, TH01's item code is on a new level of software architecture ridiculousness. First, ZUN uses distinct arrays for both types of items, with their own caps of 4 for bomb items, and 10 for point items. Since that obviously makes any type-related switch statement redundant, he also used distinct functions for both types, with copy-pasted boilerplate code. The main per-item update and render function is shared though… and takes every single accessed member of the item structure as its own reference parameter. Like, why, you have a structure, right there?! That's one way to really practice the C++ language concept of passing arbitrary structure fields by mutable reference… :zunpet:
To complete the unwarranted grand generic design of this function, it calls back into per-type collision detection, drop, and collect functions with another three reference parameters. Yeah, why use C++ virtual methods when you can also implement the effectively same polymorphism functionality by hand? Oh, and the coordinate clamping code in one of these callbacks could only possibly have come from nested min() and max() preprocessor macros. And that's how you extend such dead-simple functionality to 1¼ pushes…

Amidst all this jank, we've at least got a sensible item↔player hitbox this time, with 24 pixels around Reimu's center point to the left and right, and extending from 24 pixels above Reimu down to the bottom of the playfield. It absolutely didn't look like that from the initial naive decompilation though. Changing entity coordinates from left/top to center was one of the better lessons from TH01 that ZUN implemented in later games, it really makes collision detection code much more intuitive to grasp.


The card flip code is where we find out some slightly more interesting aspects about item drops in this game, and how they're controlled by a hidden cycle variable:

Then again, score players largely ignore point items anyway, as card combos simply have a much bigger effect on the score. With this, I should have RE'd all information necessary to construct a tool-assisted score run, though?
Edit: Turns out that 1) point items are becoming increasingly important in score runs, and 2) Pearl already did a TAS some months ago. Thanks to spaztron64 for the info!

The Orb↔card hitbox also makes perfect sense, with 24 pixels around the center point of a card in every direction.

The rest of the code confirms the card flip score formula documented on Touhou Wiki, as well as the way cards are flipped by bombs: During every of the 90 "damaging" frames of the 140-frame bomb animation, there is a 75% chance to flip the card at the [bomb_frame % total_card_count_in_stage] array index. Since stages can only have up to 50 cards 📝 thanks to a bug, even a 75% chance is high enough to typically flip most cards during a bomb. Each of these flips still only removes a single card HP, just like after a regular collision with the Orb.
Also, why are the card score popups rendered before the cards themselves? That's two needless frames of flicker during that 25-frame animation. Not all too noticeable, but still.


And that's over 50% of REIIDEN.EXE decompiled as well! Next up: More HUD update and rendering code… with a direct dependency on rank pellet speed modifications?

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0149, P0150, P0151, P0152
Commits:
e1a26bb...05e4c4a, 05e4c4a...768251d, 768251d...4d24ca5, 4d24ca5...81fc861
💰 Funded by:
Blue Bolt, Ember2528, -Tom-, [Anonymous]
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ bullet+ animation+ score- glitch+ jank+ waste+ micro-optimization+ tcc+ uth05win+

…or maybe not that soon, as it would have only wasted time to untangle the bullet update commits from the rest of the progress. So, here's all the bullet spawning code in TH04 and TH05 instead. I hope you're ready for this, there's a lot to talk about!

(For the sake of readability, "bullets" in this blog post refers to the white 8×8 pellets and all 16×16 bullets loaded from MIKO16.BFT, nothing else.)


But first, what was going on 📝 in 2020? Spent 4 pushes on the basic types and constants back then, still ended up confusing a couple of things, and even getting some wrong. Like how TH05's "bullet slowdown" flag actually always prevents slowdown and fires bullets at a constant speed instead. :tannedcirno: Or how "random spread" is not the best term to describe that unused bullet group type in TH04.
Or that there are two distinct ways of clearing all bullets on screen, which deserve different names:

Mechanic #1: Clearing bullets for a custom amount of time, awarding 1000 points for all bullets alive on the first frame, and 100 points for all bullets spawned during the clear time.
Mechanic #2: Zapping bullets for a fixed 16 frames, awarding a semi-exponential and loudly announced Bonus!! for all bullets alive on the first frame, and preventing new bullets from being spawned during those 16 frames. In TH04 at least; thanks to a ZUN bug, zapping got reduced to 1 frame and no animation in TH05…

Bullets are zapped at the end of most midboss and boss phases, and cleared everywhere else – most notably, during bombs, when losing a life, or as rewards for extends or a maximized Dream bonus. The Bonus!! points awarded for zapping bullets are calculated iteratively, so it's not trivial to give an exact formula for these. For a small number 𝑛 of bullets, it would exactly be 5𝑛³ - 10𝑛² + 15𝑛 points – or, using uth05win's (correct) recursive definition, Bonus(𝑛) = Bonus(𝑛-1) + 15𝑛² - 5𝑛 + 10. However, one of the internal step variables is capped at a different number of points for each difficulty (and game), after which the points only increase linearly. Hence, "semi-exponential".


On to TH04's bullet spawn code then, because that one can at least be decompiled. And immediately, we have to deal with a pointless distinction between regular bullets, with either a decelerating or constant velocity, and special bullets, with preset velocity changes during their lifetime. That preset has to be set somewhere, so why have separate functions? In TH04, this separation continues even down to the lowest level of functions, where values are written into the global bullet array. TH05 merges those two functions into one, but then goes too far and uses self-modifying code to save a grand total of two local variables… Luckily, the rest of its actual code is identical to TH04.

Most of the complexity in bullet spawning comes from the (thankfully shared) helper function that calculates the velocities of the individual bullets within a group. Both games handle each group type via a large switch statement, which is where TH04 shows off another Turbo C++ 4.0 optimization: If the range of case values is too sparse to be meaningfully expressed in a jump table, it usually generates a linear search through a second value table. But with the -G command-line option, it instead generates branching code for a binary search through the set of cases. 𝑂(log 𝑛) as the worst case for a switch statement in a C++ compiler from 1994… that's so cool. But still, why are the values in TH04's group type enum all over the place to begin with? :onricdennat:
Unfortunately, this optimization is pretty rare in PC-98 Touhou. It only shows up here and in a few places in TH02, compared to at least 50 switch value tables.

In all of its micro-optimized pointlessness, TH05's undecompilable version at least fixes some of TH04's redundancy. While it's still not even optimal, it's at least a decently written piece of ASM… if you take the time to understand what's going on there, because it certainly took quite a bit of that to verify that all of the things which looked like bugs or quirks were in fact correct. And that's how the code for this function ended up with 35% comments and blank lines before I could confidently call it "reverse-engineered"…
Oh well, at least it finally fixes a correctness issue from TH01 and TH04, where an invalid bullet group type would fill all remaining slots in the bullet array with identical versions of the first bullet.

Something that both games also share in these functions is an over-reliance on globals for return values or other local state. The most ridiculous example here: Tuning the speed of a bullet based on rank actually mutates the global bullet template… which ZUN then works around by adding a wrapper function around both regular and special bullet spawning, which saves the base speed before executing that function, and restores it afterward. :zunpet: Add another set of wrappers to bypass that exact tuning, and you've expanded your nice 1-function interface to 4 functions. Oh, and did I mention that TH04 pointlessly duplicates the first set of wrapper functions for 3 of the 4 difficulties, which can't even be explained with "debugging reasons"? That's 10 functions then… and probably explains why I've procrastinated this feature for so long.

At this point, I also finally stopped decompiling ZUN's original ASM just for the sake of it. All these small TH05 functions would look horribly unidiomatic, are identical to their decompiled TH04 counterparts anyway, except for some unique constant… and, in the case of TH05's rank-based speed tuning function, actually become undecompilable as soon as we want to return a C++ class to preserve the semantic meaning of the return value. Mainly, this is because Turbo C++ does not allow register pseudo-variables like _AX or _AL to be cast into class types, even if their size matches. Decompiling that function would have therefore lowered the quality of the rest of the decompiled code, in exchange for the additional maintenance and compile-time cost of another translation unit. Not worth it – and for a TH05 port, you'd already have to decompile all the rest of the bullet spawning code anyway!


The only thing in there that was still somewhat worth being decompiled was the pre-spawn clipping and collision detection function. Due to what's probably a micro-optimization mistake, the TH05 version continues to spawn a bullet even if it was spawned on top of the player. This might sound like it has a different effect on gameplay… until you realize that the player got hit in this case and will either lose a life or deathbomb, both of which will cause all on-screen bullets to be cleared anyway. So it's at most a visual glitch.

But while we're at it, can we please stop talking about hitboxes? At least in the context of TH04 and TH05 bullets. The actual collision detection is described way better as a kill delta of 8×8 pixels between the center points of the player and a bullet. You can distribute these pixels to any combination of bullet and player "hitboxes" that make up 8×8. 4×4 around both the player and bullets? 1×1 for bullets, and 8×8 for the player? All equally valid… or perhaps none of them, once you keep in mind that other entity types might have different kill deltas. With that in mind, the concept of a "hitbox" turns into just a confusing abstraction.

The same is true for the 36×44 graze box delta. For some reason, this one is not exactly around the center of a bullet, but shifted to the right by 2 pixels. So, a bullet can be grazed up to 20 pixels right of the player, but only up to 16 pixels left of the player. uth05win also spotted this… and rotated the deltas clockwise by 90°?!


Which brings us to the bullet updates… for which I still had to research a decompilation workaround, because 📝 P0148 turned out to not help at all? Instead, the solution was to lie to the compiler about the true segment distance of the popup function and declare its signature far rather than near. This allowed ZUN to save that ridiculous overhead of 1 additional far function call/return per frame, and those precious 2 bytes in the BSS segment that he didn't have to spend on a segment value. 📝 Another function that didn't have just a single declaration in a common header file… really, 📝 how were these games even built???

The function itself is among the longer ones in both games. It especially stands out in the indentation department, with 7 levels at its most indented point – and that's the minimum of what's possible without goto. Only two more notable discoveries there:

  1. Bullets are the only entity affected by Slow Mode. If the number of bullets on screen is ≥ (24 + (difficulty * 8) + rank) in TH04, or (42 + (difficulty * 8)) in TH05, Slow Mode reduces the frame rate by 33%, by waiting for one additional VSync event every two frames.
    The code also reveals a second tier, with 50% slowdown for a slightly higher number of bullets, but that conditional branch can never be executed :zunpet:
  2. Bullets must have been grazed in a previous frame before they can be collided with. (Note how this does not apply to bullets that spawned on top of the player, as explained earlier!)

Whew… When did ReC98 turn into a full-on code review?! 😅 And after all this, we're still not done with TH04 and TH05 bullets, with all the special movement types still missing. That should be less than one push though, once we get to it. Next up: Back to TH01 and Konngara! Now have fun rewriting the Touhou Wiki Gameplay pages 😛

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0092, P0093, P0094
Commits:
29c5a73...4403308, 4403308...0e73029, 0e73029...57a8487
💰 Funded by:
Yanga, Ember2528
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ file-format+ menu+ score- jank+ waste+

Three pushes to decompile the TH01 high score menu… because it's completely terrible, and needlessly complicated in pretty much every aspect:

In the end, I just gave up with my usual redundancy reduction efforts for this one. Anyone wanting to change TH01's high score name entering code would be better off just rewriting the entire thing properly.

And that's all of the shared code in TH01! Both OP.EXE and FUUIN.EXE are now only missing the actual main menu and ending code, respectively. Next up, though: The long awaited TH01 PI push. Which will not only deliver 100% PI for OP.EXE and FUUIN.EXE, but also probably quite some gains in REIIDEN.EXE. With now over 30% of the game decompiled, it's about time we get to look at some gameplay code!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0084
Commits:
dfac2f2...110d6dd
💰 Funded by:
Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ file-format+ score- tasm+

Final TH01 RE push for the time being, and as expected, we've got the superficially final piece of shared code between the TH01 executables. However, just having a single implementation for loading and recreating the REYHI*.DAT score files would have been way above ZUN's standards of consistency. So ZUN had the unique idea to mix up the file I/O APIs, using master.lib functions in REIIDEN.EXE, and POSIX functions (along with error messages and disabled interrupts) in FUUIN.EXE:zunpet: Could have been worse though, as it was possible to abstract that away quite nicely.

That code wasn't quite in the natural way of decompilation either. As it turns out though, 📝 segment splitting isn't so painful after all if one of the new segments only has a few functions. Definitely going to do that more often from now on, since it allows a much larger number of functions to be immediately decompiled. Which is always superior to somehow transforming a function's ASM into a form that I can confidently call "reverse-engineered", only to revisit it again later for its decompilation.

And while I unfortunately missed 25% of total RE by a bit, this push reached two other and perhaps even more significant milestones:

Next up, PI milestones!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0070
Commits:
a931758...327021b
💰 Funded by:
KirbyComment
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th03+ gameplay+ score-

As noted in 📝 P0061, TH03 gameplay RE is indeed going to progress very slowly in the beginning. A lot of the initial progress won't even be reflected in the RE% – there are just so many features in this game that are intertwined into each other, and I only consider functions to be "reverse-engineered" once we understand every involved piece of code and data, and labeled every absolute memory reference in it. (Yes, that means that the percentages on the front page are actually underselling ReC98's progress quite a bit, and reflect a pretty low bound of our actual understanding of the games.)

So, when I get asked to look directly at gameplay code right now, it's quite the struggle to find a place that can be covered within a push or two and that would immediately benefit scoreplayers. The basics of score and combo handling themselves managed to fit in pretty well, though:

Oh well, at least we still got a bit of PI% out of this one. From this point though, the next push (or two) should be enough to cover the big 128-byte player structure – which by itself might not be immediately interesting to scoreplayers, but surely is quite a blocker for everything else.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0063
Commits:
034ae4b...8dbb450
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ file-format+ score- waste+ jank+

Almost!

Just like most of the time, it was more sensible to cover GENSOU.SCR, the last structure missing in TH05's OP.EXE, everywhere it's used, rather than just rushing out OP.EXE position independence. I did have to look into all of the functions to fully RE it after all, and to find out whether the unused fields actually are unused. The only thing that kept this push from yielding even more above-average progress was the sheer inconsistency in how the games implemented the operations on this PC-98 equivalent of score*.dat:

Technically though, TH05's OP.EXE is position-independent now, and the rest are (should be? :tannedcirno:) merely false positives. However, TH04's is still missing another structure, in addition to its false positives. So, let's wait with the big announcement until the next push… which will also come with a demo video of what will be possible then.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0031, P0032, P0033
Commits:
dea40ad...9f764fa, 9f764fa...e6294c2, e6294c2...6cdd229
💰 Funded by:
zorg
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ file-format+ hud+ score- tasm+ tcc+ micro-optimization+ jank+

The glacial pace continues, with TH05's unnecessarily, inappropriately micro-optimized, and hence, un-decompilable code for rendering the current and high score, as well as the enemy health / dream / power bars. While the latter might still pass as well-written ASM, the former goes to such ridiculous levels that it ends up being technically buggy. If you enjoy quality ZUN code, it's definitely worth a read.

In TH05, this all still is at the end of code segment #1, but in TH04, the same code lies all over the same segment. And since I really wanted to move that code into its final form now, I finally did the research into decompiling from anywhere else in a segment.

Turns out we actually can! It's kinda annoying, though: After splitting the segment after the function we want to decompile, we then need to group the two new segments back together into one "virtual segment" matching the original one. But since all ASM in ReC98 heavily relies on being assembled in MASM mode, we then start to suffer from MASM's group addressing quirk. Which then forces us to manually prefix every single function call

with the group name. It's stupidly boring busywork, because of all the function calls you mustn't prefix. Special tooling might make this easier, but I don't have it, and I'm not getting crowdfunded for it.

So while you now definitely can request any specific thing in any of the 5 games to be decompiled right now, it will take slightly longer, and cost slightly more.
(Except for that one big segment in TH04, of course.)

Only one function away from the TH05 shot type control functions now!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0018
Commits:
746681d...178d589
💰 Funded by:
zorg
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ player+ score- uth05win+

What do you do if the TH06 text image feature for thcrap should have been done 3 days™ ago, but keeps getting more and more complex, and you have a ton of other pushes to deliver anyway? Get some distraction with some light ReC98 reverse-engineering work. This is where it becomes very obvious how much uth05win helps us with all the games, not just TH05.

5a5c347 is the most important one in there, this was the missing substructure that now makes every other sprite-like structure trivial to figure out.