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Showing all posts tagged uth05win-

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0146
Commits:
08bc188...456b621
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528, -Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th05+ tcc+ animation+ boss+ shinki+ micro-optimization+ waste+ uth05win-

Y'know, I kinda prefer the pending crowdfunded workload to stay more near the middle of the cap, rather than being sold out all the time. So to reach this point more quickly, let's do the most relaxing thing that can be easily done in TH05 right now: The boss backgrounds, starting with Shinki's, 📝 now that we've got the time to look at it in detail.

… Oh come on, more things that are borderline undecompilable, and require new workarounds to be developed? Yup, Borland C++ always optimizes any comparison of a register with a literal 0 to OR reg, reg, no matter how many calculations and inlined function calls you replace the 0 with. Shinki's background particle rendering function contains a CMP AX, 0 instruction though… so yeah, 📝 yet another piece of custom ASM that's worse than what Turbo C++ 4.0J would have generated if ZUN had just written readable C. This was probably motivated by ZUN insisting that his modified master.lib function for blitting particles takes its X and Y parameters as registers. If he had just used the __fastcall convention, he also would have got the sprite ID passed as a register. 🤷
So, we really don't want to be forced into inline assembly just because of the third comparison in the otherwise perfectly decompilable four-comparison if() expression that prevents invisible particles from being drawn. The workaround: Comparing to a pointer instead, which only the linker gets to resolve to the actual value of 0. :tannedcirno: This way, the compiler has to make room for any 16-bit literal, and can't optimize anything.


And then we go straight from micro-optimization to waste, with all the duplication in the code that animates all those particles together with the zooming and spinning lines. This push decompiled 1.31% of all code in TH05, and thanks to alignment, we're still missing Shinki's high-level background rendering function that calls all the subfunctions I decompiled here.
With all the manipulated state involved here, it's not at all trivial to see how this code produces what you see in-game. Like:

  1. If all lines have the same Y velocity, how do the other three lines in background type B get pushed down into this vertical formation while the top one stays still? (Answer: This velocity is only applied to the top line, the other lines are only pushed based on some delta.)
  2. How can this delta be calculated based on the distance of the top line with its supposed target point around Shinki's wings? (Answer: The velocity is never set to 0, so the top line overshoots this target point in every frame. After calculating the delta, the top line itself is pushed down as well, canceling out the movement. :zunpet:)
  3. Why don't they get pushed down infinitely, but stop eventually? (Answer: We only see four lines out of 20, at indices #0, #6, #12, and #18. In each frame, lines [0..17] are copied to lines [1..18], before anything gets moved. The invisible lines are pushed down based on the delta as well, which defines a distance between the visible lines of (velocity * array gap). And since the velocity is capped at -14 pixels per frame, this also means a maximum distance of 84 pixels between the midpoints of each line.)
  4. And why are the lines moving back up when switching to background type C, before moving down? (Answer: Because type C increases the velocity rather than decreasing it. Therefore, it relies on the previous velocity state from type B to show a gapless animation.)
So yeah, it's a nice-looking effect, just very hard to understand. 😵

With the amount of effort I'm putting into this project, I typically gravitate towards more descriptive function names. Here, however, uth05win's simple and seemingly tiny-brained "background type A/B/C/D" was quite a smart choice. It clearly defines the sequence in which these animations are intended to be shown, and as we've seen with point 4 from the list above, that does indeed matter.

Next up: At least EX-Alice's background animations, and probably also the high-level parts of the background rendering for all the other TH05 bosses.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0109
Commits:
dcf4e2c...2c7d86b
💰 Funded by:
[Anonymous], Blue Bolt
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ bullet+ micro-optimization+ glitch+ uth05win- tasm+

Back to TH05! Thanks to the good funding situation, I can strike a nice balance between getting TH05 position-independent as quickly as possible, and properly reverse-engineering some missing important parts of the game. Once 100% PI will get the attention of modders, the code will then be in better shape, and a bit more usable than if I just rushed that goal.

By now, I'm apparently also pretty spoiled by TH01's immediate decompilability, after having worked on that game for so long. Reverse-engineering in ASM land is pretty annoying, after all, since it basically boils down to meticulously editing a piece of ASM into something I can confidently call "reverse-engineered". Most of the time, simply decompiling that piece of code would take just a little bit longer, but be massively more useful. So, I immediately tried decompiling with TH05… and it just worked, at every place I tried!? Whatever the issue was that made 📝 segment splitting so annoying at my first attempt, I seem to have completely solved it in the meantime. 🤷 So yeah, backers can now request pretty much any part of TH04 and TH05 to be decompiled immediately, with no additional segment splitting cost.

(Protip for everyone interested in starting their own ReC project: Just declare one segment per function, right from the start, then group them together to restore the original code segmentation…)


Except that TH05 then just throws more of its infamous micro-optimized and undecompilable ASM at you. 🙄 This push covered the function that adjusts the bullet group template based on rank and the selected difficulty, called every time such a group is configured. Which, just like pretty much all of TH05's bullet spawning code, is one of those undecompilable functions. If C allowed labels of other functions as goto targets, it might have been decompilable into something useful to modders… maybe. But like this, there's no point in even trying.

This is such a terrible idea from a software architecture point of view, I can't even. Because now, you suddenly have to mirror your C++ declarations in ASM land, and keep them in sync with each other. I'm always happy when I get to delete an ASM declaration from the codebase once I've decompiled all the instances where it was referenced. But for TH05, we now have to keep those declarations around forever. 😕 And all that for a performance increase you probably couldn't even measure. Oh well, pulling off Galaxy Brain-level ASM optimizations is kind of fun if you don't have portability plans… I guess?

If I started a full fangame mod of a PC-98 Touhou game, I'd base it on TH04 rather than TH05, and backport selective features from TH05 as needed. Just because it was released later doesn't make it better, and this is by far not the only one of ZUN's micro-optimizations that just went way too far.

Dropping down to ASM also makes it easier to introduce weird quirks. Decompiled, one of TH05's tuning conditions for stack groups on Easy Mode would look something like:

case BP_STACK:
	// […]
	if(spread_angle_delta >= 2) {
		stack_bullet_count--;
	}
The fields of the bullet group template aren't typically reset when setting up a new group. So, spread_angle_delta in the context of a stack group effectively refers to "the delta angle of the last spread group that was fired before this stack – whenever that was". uth05win also spotted this quirk, considered it a bug, and wrote fanfiction by changing spread_angle_delta to stack_bullet_count.
As usual for functions that occur in more than one game, I also decompiled the TH04 bullet group tuning function, and it's perfectly sane, with no such quirks.


In the more PI-focused parts of this push, we got the TH05-exclusive smooth boss movement functions, for flying randomly or towards a given point. Pretty unspectacular for the most part, but we've got yet another uth05win inconsistency in the latter one. Once the Y coordinate gets close enough to the target point, it actually speeds up twice as much as the X coordinate would, whereas uth05win used the same speedup factors for both. This might make uth05win a couple of frames slower in all boss fights from Stage 3 on. Hard to measure though – and boss movement partly depends on RNG anyway.


Next up: Shinki's background animations – which are actually the single biggest source of position dependence left in TH05.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0078, P0079
Commits:
f4eb7a8...9e52cb1, 9e52cb1...cd48aa3
💰 Funded by:
iruleatgames, -Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ animation+ bullet+ boss+ alice+ mai+ yuki+ yumeko+ shinki+ ex-alice+ uth05win-

To finish this TH05 stretch, we've got a feature that's exclusive to TH05 for once! As the final memory management innovation in PC-98 Touhou, TH05 provides a single static (64 * 26)-byte array for storing up to 64 entities of a custom type, specific to a stage or boss portion. The game uses this array for

  1. the Stage 2 star particles,
  2. Alice's puppets,
  3. the tip of curve ("jello") bullets,
  4. Mai's snowballs and Yuki's fireballs,
  5. Yumeko's swords,
  6. and Shinki's 32×32 bullets,

which makes sense, given that only one of those will be active at any given time.

On the surface, they all appear to share the same 26-byte structure, with consistently sized fields, merely using its 5 generic fields for different purposes. Looking closer though, there actually are differences in the signedness of certain fields across the six types. uth05win chose to declare them as entirely separate structures, and given all the semantic differences (pixels vs. subpixels, regular vs. tiny master.lib sprites, …), it made sense to do the same in ReC98. It quickly turned out to be the only solution to meet my own standards of code readability.

Which blew this one up to two pushes once again… But now, modders can trivially resize any of those structures without affecting the other types within the original (64 * 26)-byte boundary, even without full position independence. While you'd still have to reduce the type-specific number of distinct entities if you made any structure larger, you could also have more entities with fewer structure members.

As for the types themselves, they're full of redundancy once again – as you might have already expected from seeing #4, #5, and #6 listed as unrelated to each other. Those could have indeed been merged into a single 32×32 bullet type, supporting all the unique properties of #4 (destructible, with optional revenge bullets), #5 (optional number of twirl animation frames before they begin to move) and #6 (delay clouds). The *_add(), *_update(), and *_render() functions of #5 and #6 could even already be completely reverse-engineered from just applying the structure onto the ASM, with the ones of #3 and #4 only needing one more RE push.

But perhaps the most interesting discovery here is in the curve bullets: TH05 only renders every second one of the 17 nodes in a curve bullet, yet hit-tests every single one of them. In practice, this is an acceptable optimization though – you only start to notice jagged edges and gaps between the fragments once their speed exceeds roughly 11 pixels per second:

And that brings us to the last 20% of TH05 position independence! But first, we'll have more cheap and fast TH01 progress.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0072, P0073, P0074, P0075
Commits:
4bb04ab...cea3ea6, cea3ea6...5286417, 5286417...1807906, 1807906...222fc99
💰 Funded by:
[Anonymous], -Tom-, Myles
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ blitting+ bullet+ micro-optimization+ uth05win-

Long time no see! And this is exactly why I've been procrastinating bullets while there was still meaningful progress to be had in other parts of TH04 and TH05: There was bound to be quite some complexity in this most central piece of game logic, and so I couldn't possibly get to a satisfying understanding in just one push.

Or in two, because their rendering involves another bunch of micro-optimized functions adapted from master.lib.

Or in three, because we'd like to actually name all the bullet sprites, since there are a number of sprite ID-related conditional branches. And so, I was refining things I supposedly RE'd in the the commits from the first push until the very end of the fourth.

When we talk about "bullets" in TH04 and TH05, we mean just two things: the white 8×8 pellets, with a cap of 240 in TH04 and 180 in TH05, and any 16×16 sprites from MIKO16.BFT, with a cap of 200 in TH04 and 220 in TH05. These are by far the most common types of… err, "things the player can collide with", and so ZUN provides a whole bunch of pre-made motion, animation, and n-way spread / ring / stack group options for those, which can be selected by simply setting a few fields in the bullet template. All the other "non-bullets" have to be fired and controlled individually.

Which is nothing new, since uth05win covered this part pretty accurately – I don't think anyone could just make up these structure member overloads. The interesting insights here all come from applying this research to TH04, and figuring out its differences compared to TH05. The most notable one there is in the default groups: TH05 allows you to add a stack to any single bullet, n-way spread or ring, but TH04 only lets you create stacks separately from n-way spreads and rings, and thus gets by with fewer fields in its bullet template structure. On the other hand, TH04 has a separate "n-way spread with random angles, yet still aimed at the player" group? Which seems to be unused, at least as far as midbosses and bosses are concerned; can't say anything about stage enemies yet.

In fact, TH05's larger bullet template structure illustrates that these distinct group types actually are a rather redundant piece of over-engineering. You can perfectly indicate any permutation of the basic groups through just the stack bullet count (1 = no stack), spread bullet count (1 = no spread), and spread delta angle (0 = ring instead of spread). Add a 4-flag bitfield to cover the rest (aim to player, randomize angle, randomize speed, force single bullet regardless of difficulty or rank), and the result would be less redundant and even slightly more capable.

Even those 4 pushes didn't quite finish all of the bullet-related types, stopping just shy of the most trivial and consistent enum that defines special movement. This also left us in a 📝 TH03-like situation, in which we're still a bit away from actually converting all this research into actual RE%. Oh well, at least this got us way past 50% in overall position independence. On to the second half! 🎉

For the next push though, we'll first have a quick detour to the remaining C code of all the ZUN.COM binaries. Now that the 📝 TH04 and TH05 resident structures no longer block those, -Tom- has requested TH05's RES_KSO.COM to be covered in one of his outstanding pushes. And since 32th System recently RE'd TH03's resident structure, it makes sense to also review and merge that, before decompiling all three remaining RES_*.COM binaries in hopefully a single push. It might even get done faster than that, in which case I'll then review and merge some more of WindowsTiger's research.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0059
Commits:
01de290...8b62780
💰 Funded by:
[Anonymous], -Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ pc98+ position-independence+ uth05win- meta+

With no feedback to 📝 last week's blog post, I assume you all are fine with how things are going? Alright then, another one towards position independence, with the same approach as before…

Since -Tom- wanted to learn something about how the PC-98 EGC is used in TH04 and TH05, I took a look at master.lib's egc_shift_*() functions. These simply do a hardware-accelerated memmove() of any VRAM region, and are used for screen shaking effects. Hover over the image below for the raw effect:

Then, I finally wanted to take a look at the bullet structures, but it required way too much reverse-engineering to even start within ¾ of a position independence push. Even with the help of uth05win – bullet handling was changed quite a bit from TH04 to TH05.

What I ultimately settled on was more raw, "boring" PI work based around an already known set of functions. For this one, I looked at vector construction… and this time, that actually made the games a little bit more position-independent, and wasn't just all about removing false positives from the calculation. This was one of the few sets of functions that would also apply to TH01, and it revealed just how chaotically that game was coded. This one commit shows three ways how ZUN stored regular 2D points in TH01:

  • "regularly", like in master.lib's Point structure (X first, Y second)
  • reversed, (Y first and X second), then obviously with two distinct variables declared next to each other
  • and with multiple points stored in a structure of arrays.

… yeah. But in more productive news, this did actually lay the groundwork for TH04 and TH05 bullet structures. Which might even be coming up within the next big, 5-push order from Touhou Patch Center? These are the priorities I got from them, let's see how close I can get!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0057, P0058
Commits:
1cb9731...ac7540d, ac7540d...fef0299
💰 Funded by:
[Anonymous], -Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ item+ animation+ uth05win- meta+

So, here we have the first two pushes with an explicit focus on position independence… and they start out looking barely different from regular reverse-engineering? They even already deduplicate a bunch of item-related code, which was simple enough that it required little additional work? Because the actual work, once again, was in comparing uth05win's interpretations and naming choices with the original PC-98 code? So that we only ended up removing a handful of memory references there?

(Oh well, you can mod item drops now!)

So, continuing to interpret PI as a mere by-product of reverse-engineering might ultimately drive up the total PI cost quite a bit. But alright then, let's systematically clear out some false positives by looking at master.lib function calls instead… and suddenly we get the PI progress we were looking for, nicely spread out over all games since TH02. That kinda makes it sound like useless work, only done because it's dictated by some counting algorithm on a website. But decompilation will want to convert all of these values to decimal anyway. We're merely doing that right now, across all games.

Then again, it doesn't actually make any game more position-independent, and only proves how position-independent it already was. So I'm really wondering right now whether I should just rush actual position independence by simply identifying structures and their sizes, and not bother with members or false positives until that's done. That would certainly get the job done for TH04 and TH05 in just a few more pushes, but then leave all the proving work (and the road to 100% PI on the front page) to reverse-engineering.

I don't know. Would it be worth it to have a game that's „maybe fully position-independent“, only for there to maybe be rare edge cases where it isn't?

Or maybe, continuing to strike a balance between identifying false positives (fast) and reverse-engineering structures (slow) will continue to work out like it did now, and make us end up close to the current estimate, which was attractive enough to sell out the crowdfunding for the first time… 🤔

Please give feedback! If possible, by Friday evening UTC+1, before I start working on the next PI push, this time with a focus on TH04.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0043, P0044, P0045
Commits:
261d503...612beb8
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th03+ th04+ th05+ pc98+ blitting+ uth05win-

Turns out I had only been about half done with the drawing routines. The rest was all related to redrawing the scrolling stage backgrounds after other sprites were drawn on top. Since the PC-98 does have hardware-accelerated scrolling, but no hardware-accelerated sprites, everything that draws animated sprites into a scrolling VRAM must then also make sure that the background tiles covered by the sprite are redrawn in the next frame, which required a bit of ZUN code. And that are the functions that have been in the way of the expected rapid reverse-engineering progress that uth05win was supposed to bring. So, looks like everything's going to go really fast now?

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0042
Commits:
f3b6137...807df3d
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ laser+ uth05win-

Laser… is not difficult. In fact, out of the remaining entity types I checked, it's the easiest one to fully grasp from uth05win alone, as it's only drawn using master.lib's line, circle, and polygon functions. Everything else ends up calling… something sprite-related that needs to be RE'd separately, and which uth05win doesn't help with, at all.

Oh, and since the speed of shoot-out lasers (as used by TH05's Stage 2 boss, for example) always depends on rank, we also got this variable now.

This only covers the structure itself – uth05win's member names for the LASER structure were not only a bit too unclear, but also plain wrong and misleading in one instance. The actual implementation will follow in the next one.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0018
Commits:
746681d...178d589
💰 Funded by:
zorg
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ player+ score+ uth05win-

What do you do if the TH06 text image feature for thcrap should have been done 3 days™ ago, but keeps getting more and more complex, and you have a ton of other pushes to deliver anyway? Get some distraction with some light ReC98 reverse-engineering work. This is where it becomes very obvious how much uth05win helps us with all the games, not just TH05.

5a5c347 is the most important one in there, this was the missing substructure that now makes every other sprite-like structure trivial to figure out.