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Showing all posts tagged bullet- and blitting-

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0201, P0202
Commits:
9342665...ff49e9e, ff49e9e...4568bf7
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528, Yanga, [Anonymous]
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ gameplay+ boss+ singyoku+ blitting- glitch+ animation+ bullet-

The positive:

The negative:

The overview:


This time, we're back to the Orb hitbox being a logical 49×49 pixels in SinGyoku's center, and the shot hitbox being the weird one. What happens if you want the shot hitbox to be both offset to the left a bit and stretch the entire width of SinGyoku's sprite? You get a hitbox that ends in mid-air, far away from the right edge of the sprite:

Due to VRAM byte alignment, all player shots fired between gx = 376 and gx = 383 inclusive appear at the same visual X position, but are internally already partly outside the hitbox and therefore won't hit SinGyoku – compare gx = 376 to gx = 380. So much for precisely visualizing hitboxes in this game…

Since the female and male forms also use the sphere entity's coordinates, they share the same hitbox.


Onto the rendering glitches then, which can – you guessed it – all be found in the sphere form's slam movement:

By having the sphere move from the right edge of the playfield to the left, this video demonstrates both the lazy reblitting and broken unblitting at the right edge for negative X velocities. Also, isn't it funny how Reimu can partly disappear from all the sloppy SinGyoku-related unblitting going on after her sprite was blitted?

Due to the low contrast of the sphere against the background, you typically don't notice these glitches, but the white invincibility flashing after a hit really does draw attention to them. This time, all of these glitches aren't even directly caused by ZUN having never learned about the EGC's bit length register – if he just wrote correct code for SinGyoku, none of this would have been an issue. Sigh… I wonder how many more glitches will be caused by improper use of this one function in the last 18% of REIIDEN.EXE.

There's even another bug here, with ZUN hardcoding a horizontal delta of 8 pixels rather than just passing the actual X velocity. Luckily, the maximum movement speed is 6 pixels on Lunatic, and this would have only turned into an additional observable glitch if the X velocity were to exceed 24 pixels. But that just means it's the kind of bug that still drains RE attention to prove that you can't actually observe it in-game under some circumstances.


The 5 pellet patterns are all pretty straightforward, with nothing to talk about. The code architecture during phase 2 does hint towards ZUN having had more creative patterns in mind – especially for the male form, which uses the transformation function's three pattern callback slots for three repetitions of the same pellet group.
There is one more oddity to be found at the very end of the fight:

The first frame of TH01 SinGyoku's defeat animation, showing the sphere blitted on top of a potentially active person form

Right before the defeat white-out animation, the sphere form is explicitly reblitted for no reason, on top of the form that was blitted to VRAM in the previous frame, and regardless of which form is currently active. If SinGyoku was meant to immediately transform back to the sphere form before being defeated, why isn't the person form unblitted before then? Therefore, the visibility of both forms is undeniably canon, and there is some lore meaning to be found here… :thonk:
In any case, that's SinGyoku done! 6th PC-98 Touhou boss fully decompiled, 25 remaining.


No FUUIN.EXE code rounding out the last push for a change, as the 📝 remaining missile code has been waiting in front of SinGyoku for a while. It already looked bad in November, but the angle-based sprite selection function definitely takes the cake when it comes to unnecessary and decadent floating-point abuse in this game.
The algorithm itself is very trivial: Even with 📝 .PTN requiring an additional quarter parameter to access 16×16 sprites, it's essentially just one bit shift, one addition, and one binary AND. For whatever reason though, ZUN casts the 8-bit missile angle into a 64-bit double, which turns the following explicit comparisons (!) against all possible 4 + 16 boundary angles (!!) into FPU operations. :zunpet: Even with naive and readable division and modulo operations, and the whole existence of this function not playing well with Turbo C++ 4.0J's terrible code generation at all, this could have been 3 lines of code and 35 un-inlined constant-time instructions. Instead, we've got this 207-instruction monster… but hey, at least it works. 🤷
The remaining time then went to YuugenMagan's initialization code, which allowed me to immediately remove more declarations from ASM land, but more on that once we get to the rest of that boss fight.

That leaves 76 functions until we're done with TH01! Next up: Card-flipping stage obstacles.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0184, P0185
Commits:
f9d983e...f918298, f918298...a21ab3d
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-, Blue Bolt, [Anonymous]
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ louise+ shinki+ bullet- danmaku-pattern+ uth05win+ blitting-

Two years after 📝 the first look at TH04's and TH05's bullets, we finally get to finish their logic code by looking at the special motion types. Bullets as a whole still aren't completely finished as the rendering code is still waiting to be RE'd, but now we've got everything about them that's required for decompiling the midboss and boss fights of these games.

Just like the motion types of TH01's pellets, the ones we've got here really are special enough to warrant an enum, despite all the overlap in the "slow down and turn" and "bounce at certain edges of the playfield" types. Sure, including them in the bitfield I proposed two years ago would have allowed greater variety, but it wouldn't have saved any memory. On the contrary: These types use a single global state variable for the maximum turn count and delta speed, which a proper customizable architecture would have to integrate into the bullet structure. Maybe it is possible to stuff everything into the same amount of bytes, but not without first completely rearchitecting the bullet structure and removing every single piece of redundancy in there. Simply extending the system by adding a new enum value for a new motion type would be way more straightforward for modders.

Speaking about memory, TH05 already extends the bullet structure by 6 bytes for the "exact linear movement" type exclusive to that game. This type is particularly interesting for all the prospective PC-98 game developers out there, as it nicely points out the precision limits of Q12.4 subpixels.
Regular bullet movement works by adding a Q12.4 velocity to a Q12.4 position every frame, with the velocity typically being calculated only once on spawn time from an 8-bit angle and a Q12.4 speed. Quantization errors from this initial calculation can quickly compound over all the frames a bullet spends moving across the playfield. If a bullet is only supposed to move on a straight line though, there is a more precise way of calculating its position: By storing the origin point, movement angle, and total distance traveled, you can perform a full polar→Cartesian transformation every frame. Out of the 10 danmaku patterns in TH05 that use this motion type, the difference to regular bullet movement can be best seen in Louise's final pattern:

Louise's final pattern in its original form, demonstrating exact linear bullet movement. Note how each bullet spawns slightly behind the delay cloud: ZUN simply forgot to shift the fixed origin point along with it.
The same pattern with standard bullet movement, corrupting its intended appearance. No delay cloud-related oversights here though, at least.

Not far away from the regular bullet code, we've also got the movement function for the infamous curve / "cheeto" bullets. I would have almost called them "cheetos" in the code as well, which surely fits more nicely into 8.3 filenames than "curve bullets" does, but eh, trademarks…

As for hitboxes, we got a 16×16 one on the head node, and a 12×12 one on the 16 trail nodes. The latter simply store the position of the head node during the last 16 frames, Snake style. But what you're all here for is probably the turning and homing algorithm, right? Boiled down to its essence, it works like this:

// [head] points to the controlled "head" part of a curve bullet entity.
// Angles are stored with 8 bits representing a full circle, providing free
// normalization on arithmetic overflow.
// The directions are ordered as you would expect:
// • 0x00: right	(sin(0x00) =  0, cos(0x00) = +1)
// • 0x40: down 	(sin(0x40) = +1, cos(0x40) =  0)
// • 0x80: left 	(sin(0x80) =  0, cos(0x80) = -1)
// • 0xC0: up   	(sin(0xC0) = -1, cos(0xC0) =  0)
uint8_t angle_delta = (head->angle - player_angle_from(
	head->pos.cur.x, head->pos.cur.y
));

// Stop turning if the player is 1/128ths of a circle away from this bullet
const uint8_t SNAP = 0x02;

// Else, turn either clockwise or counterclockwise by 1/256th of a circle,
// depending on what would reach the player the fastest.
if((angle_delta > SNAP) && (angle_delta < static_cast(-SNAP))) {
	angle_delta = (angle_delta >= 0x80) ? -0x01 : +0x01;
}
head_p->angle -= angle_delta;

5 lines of code, and not all too difficult to follow once you are familiar with 8-bit angles… unlike what ZUN actually wrote. Which is 26 lines, and includes an unused "friction" variable that is never set to any value that makes a difference in the formula. :zunpet:. uth05win correctly saw through that all and simplified this code to something equivalent to my explanation. Redoing that work certainly wasted a bit of my time, and means that I now definitely need to spend another push on RE'ing all the shared boss functions before I can start with Shinki.

So while a curve bullet's speed does get faster over time, its angular velocity is always limited to 1/256th of a circle per frame. This reveals the optimal strategy for dodging them: Maximize this delta angle by staying as close to 180° away from their current direction as possible, and let their acceleration do the rest.

At least that's the theory for dodging a single one. As a danmaku designer, you can now of course place other bullets at these technically optimal places to prevent a curve bullet pattern from being cheesed like that. I certainly didn't record the video above in a single take either… :tannedcirno:


After another bunch of boring entity spawn and update functions, the playfield shaking feature turned out as the most notable (and tricky) one to round out these two pushes. It's actually implemented quite well in how it simply "un-shakes" the screen by just marking every stage tile to be redrawn. In the context of all the other tile invalidation that can take place during a frame, that's definitely more performant than 📝 doing another EGC-accelerated memmove() . Due to these two games being double-buffered via page flipping, this invalidation only really needs to happen for the frame after the next one though. The immediately next frame will show the regular, un-shaken playfield on the other VRAM page first, except during the multi-frame shake animation when defeating a midboss, where it will also appear shifted in a different direction… 😵 Yeah, no wonder why ZUN just always invalidates all stage tiles for the next two frames after every shaking animation, which is guaranteed to handle both sporadic single-frame shakes and continuous ones. So close to good-code here.

Finally, this delivery was delayed a bit because -Tom- requested his round-up amount to be limited to the cap in the future. Since that makes it kind of hard to explain on a static page how much money he will exactly provide, I now properly modeled these discounts in the website code. The exact round-up amount is now included in both the pre-purchase breakdown, as well as the cap bar on the main page.
With that in place, the system is now also set up for round-up offers from other patrons. If you'd also like to support certain goals in this way, with any amount of money, now's the time for getting in touch with me about that. Known contributors only, though! 😛

Next up: The final bunch of shared boring boss functions. Which certainly will give me a break from all the maintenance and research work, and speed up delivery progress again… right?

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0165, P0166, P0167
Commits:
7a0e5d8...f2bca01, f2bca01...e697907, e697907...c2de6ab
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ gameplay+ animation+ blitting- bullet- glitch+ waste+ boss+ singyoku+ mima-th01+ elis+ tcc+ menu+

OK, TH01 missile bullets. Can we maybe have a well-behaved entity type, without any weirdness? Just once?

Ehh, kinda. Apart from another 150 bytes wasted on unused structure members, this code is indeed more on the low end in terms of overall jank. It does become very obvious why dodging these missiles in the YuugenMagan, Mima, and Elis fights feels so awful though: An unfair 46×46 pixel hitbox around Reimu's center pixel, combined with the comeback of 📝 interlaced rendering, this time in every stage. ZUN probably did this because missiles are the only 16×16 sprite in TH01 that is blitted to unaligned X positions, which effectively ends up touching a 32×16 area of VRAM per sprite.
But even if we assume VRAM writes to be the bottleneck here, it would have been totally possible to render every missile in every frame at roughly the same amount of CPU time that the original game uses for interlaced rendering:

That's an optimization that would have significantly benefitted the game, in contrast to all of the fake ones introduced in later games. Then again, this optimization is actually something that the later games do, and it might have in fact been necessary to achieve their higher bullet counts without significant slowdown.

Unfortunately, it was only worth decompiling half of the missile code right now, thanks to gratuitous FPU usage in the other half, where 📝 double variables are compared to float literals. That one will have to wait 📝 until after SinGyoku.


After some effectively unused Mima sprite effect code that is so broken that it's impossible to make sense out of it, we get to the final feature I wanted to cover for all bosses in parallel before returning to Sariel: The separate sprite background storage for moving or animated boss sprites in the Mima, Elis, and Sariel fights. But, uh… why is this necessary to begin with? Doesn't TH01 already reserve the other VRAM page for backgrounds?
Well, these sprites are quite big, and ZUN didn't want to blit them from main memory on every frame. After all, TH01 and TH02 had a minimum required clock speed of 33 MHz, half of the speed required for the later three games. So, he simply blitted these boss sprites to both VRAM pages, leading the usual unblitting calls to only remove the other sprites on top of the boss. However, these bosses themselves want to move across the screen… and this makes it necessary to save the stage background behind them in some other way.

Enter .PTN, and its functions to capture a 16×16 or 32×32 square from VRAM into a sprite slot. No problem with that approach in theory, as the size of all these bigger sprites is a multiple of 32×32; splitting a larger sprite into these smaller 32×32 chunks makes the code look just a little bit clumsy (and, of course, slower).
But somewhere during the development of Mima's fight, ZUN apparently forgot that those sprite backgrounds existed. And once Mima's 🚫 casting sprite is blitted on top of her regular sprite, using just regular sprite transparency, she ends up with her infamous third arm:

TH01 Mima's third arm

Ironically, there's an unused code path in Mima's unblit function where ZUN assumes a height of 48 pixels for Mima's animation sprites rather than the actual 64. This leads to even clumsier .PTN function calls for the bottom 128×16 pixels… Failing to unblit the bottom 16 pixels would have also yielded that third arm, although it wouldn't have looked as natural. Still wouldn't say that it was intentional; maybe this casting sprite was just added pretty late in the game's development?


So, mission accomplished, Sariel unblocked… at 2¼ pushes. :thonk: That's quite some time left for some smaller stage initialization code, which bundles a bunch of random function calls in places where they logically really don't belong. The stage opening animation then adds a bunch of VRAM inter-page copies that are not only redundant but can't even be understood without knowing the hidden internal state of the last VRAM page accessed by previous ZUN code…
In better news though: Turbo C++ 4.0 really doesn't seem to have any complexity limit on inlining arithmetic expressions, as long as they only operate on compile-time constants. That's how we get macro-free, compile-time Shift-JIS to JIS X 0208 conversion of the individual code points in the 東方★靈異伝 string, in a compiler from 1994. As long as you don't store any intermediate results in variables, that is… :tannedcirno:

But wait, there's more! With still ¼ of a push left, I also went for the boss defeat animation, which includes the route selection after the SinGyoku fight.
As in all other instances, the 2× scaled font is accomplished by first rendering the text at regular 1× resolution to the other, invisible VRAM page, and then scaled from there to the visible one. However, the route selection is unique in that its scaled text is both drawn transparently on top of the stage background (not onto a black one), and can also change colors depending on the selection. It would have been no problem to unblit and reblit the text by rendering the 1× version to a position on the invisible VRAM page that isn't covered by the 2× version on the visible one, but ZUN (needlessly) clears the invisible page before rendering any text. :zunpet: Instead, he assigned a separate VRAM color for both the 魔界 and 地獄 options, and only changed the palette value for these colors to white or gray, depending on the correct selection. This is another one of the 📝 rare cases where TH01 demonstrates good use of PC-98 hardware, as the 魔界へ and 地獄へ strings don't need to be reblitted during the selection process, only the Orb "cursor" does.

Then, why does this still not count as good-code? When changing palette colors, you kinda need to be aware of everything else that can possibly be on screen, which colors are used there, and which aren't and can therefore be used for such an effect without affecting other sprites. In this case, well… hover over the image below, and notice how Reimu's hair and the bomb sprites in the HUD light up when Makai is selected:

Demonstration of palette changes in TH01's route selection

This push did end on a high note though, with the generic, non-SinGyoku version of the defeat animation being an easily parametrizable copy. And that's how you decompile another 2.58% of TH01 in just slightly over three pushes.


Now, we're not only ready to decompile Sariel, but also Kikuri, Elis, and SinGyoku without needing any more detours into non-boss code. Thanks to the current TH01 funding subscriptions, I can plan to cover most, if not all, of Sariel in a single push series, but the currently 3 pending pushes probably won't suffice for Sariel's 8.10% of all remaining code in TH01. We've got quite a lot of not specifically TH01-related funds in the backlog to pass the time though.

Due to recent developments, it actually makes quite a lot of sense to take a break from TH01: spaztron64 has managed what every Touhou download site so far has failed to do: Bundling all 5 game onto a single .HDI together with pre-configured PC-98 emulators and a nice boot menu, and hosting the resulting package on a proper website. While this first release is already quite good (and much better than my attempt from 2014), there is still a bit of room for improvement to be gained from specific ReC98 research. Next up, therefore:

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0072, P0073, P0074, P0075
Commits:
4bb04ab...cea3ea6, cea3ea6...5286417, 5286417...1807906, 1807906...222fc99
💰 Funded by:
[Anonymous], -Tom-, Myles
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ blitting- bullet- micro-optimization+ uth05win+

Long time no see! And this is exactly why I've been procrastinating bullets while there was still meaningful progress to be had in other parts of TH04 and TH05: There was bound to be quite some complexity in this most central piece of game logic, and so I couldn't possibly get to a satisfying understanding in just one push.

Or in two, because their rendering involves another bunch of micro-optimized functions adapted from master.lib.

Or in three, because we'd like to actually name all the bullet sprites, since there are a number of sprite ID-related conditional branches. And so, I was refining things I supposedly RE'd in the the commits from the first push until the very end of the fourth.

When we talk about "bullets" in TH04 and TH05, we mean just two things: the white 8×8 pellets, with a cap of 240 in TH04 and 180 in TH05, and any 16×16 sprites from MIKO16.BFT, with a cap of 200 in TH04 and 220 in TH05. These are by far the most common types of… err, "things the player can collide with", and so ZUN provides a whole bunch of pre-made motion, animation, and n-way spread / ring / stack group options for those, which can be selected by simply setting a few fields in the bullet template. All the other "non-bullets" have to be fired and controlled individually.

Which is nothing new, since uth05win covered this part pretty accurately – I don't think anyone could just make up these structure member overloads. The interesting insights here all come from applying this research to TH04, and figuring out its differences compared to TH05. The most notable one there is in the default groups: TH05 allows you to add a stack to any single bullet, n-way spread or ring, but TH04 only lets you create stacks separately from n-way spreads and rings, and thus gets by with fewer fields in its bullet template structure. On the other hand, TH04 has a separate "n-way spread with random angles, yet still aimed at the player" group? Which seems to be unused, at least as far as midbosses and bosses are concerned; can't say anything about stage enemies yet.

In fact, TH05's larger bullet template structure illustrates that these distinct group types actually are a rather redundant piece of over-engineering. You can perfectly indicate any permutation of the basic groups through just the stack bullet count (1 = no stack), spread bullet count (1 = no spread), and spread delta angle (0 = ring instead of spread). Add a 4-flag bitfield to cover the rest (aim to player, randomize angle, randomize speed, force single bullet regardless of difficulty or rank), and the result would be less redundant and even slightly more capable.

Even those 4 pushes didn't quite finish all of the bullet-related types, stopping just shy of the most trivial and consistent enum that defines special movement. This also left us in a 📝 TH03-like situation, in which we're still a bit away from actually converting all this research into actual RE%. Oh well, at least this got us way past 50% in overall position independence. On to the second half! 🎉

For the next push though, we'll first have a quick detour to the remaining C code of all the ZUN.COM binaries. Now that the 📝 TH04 and TH05 resident structures no longer block those, -Tom- has requested TH05's RES_KSO.COM to be covered in one of his outstanding pushes. And since 32th System recently RE'd TH03's resident structure, it makes sense to also review and merge that, before decompiling all three remaining RES_*.COM binaries in hopefully a single push. It might even get done faster than that, in which case I'll then review and merge some more of WindowsTiger's research.