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📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0203, P0204
Commits:
4568bf7...86cdf5f, 86cdf5f...0c682b5
💰 Funded by:
GhostRiderCog, [Anonymous], Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ meta+ gameplay+ card-flipping+ player+ shot- mod+ rng+ bomb+ waste+

Let's start right with the milestones:


So, how did this card-flipping stage obstacle delivery get so horribly delayed? With all the different layouts showcased in the 28 card-flipping stages, you'd expect this to be among the more stable and bug-free parts of the codebase. Heck, with all stage objects being placed on a 32×32-pixel grid, this is the first TH01-related blog post this year that doesn't have to describe an alignment-related unblitting glitch!

That alone doesn't mean that this code is free from quirky behavior though, and we have to look no further than the first few lines of the collision handling for round bumpers to already find a whole lot of that. Simplified, they do the following:

pixel_t delta_y_between_orb_and_bumper = (orb.top - bumper.top);
if(delta_y_between_orb_and_bumper <= 0) {
	orb.top = (bumper.top - 24);
} else {
	orb.top = (bumper.top + 24);
}

Immediately, you wonder why these assignments only exist for the Y coordinate. Sure, hitting a bumper from the left or right side should happen less often, but it's definitely possible. Is it really a good idea to warp the Orb to the top or bottom edge of a bumper regardless?
What's more important though: The fact that these immediate assignments exist at all. The game's regular Orb physics work by producing a Y velocity from the single force acting on the Orb and a gravity factor, and are completely independent of its current Y position. A bumper collision does also apply a new force onto the Orb further down in the code, but these assignments still bypass the physics system and are bound to have some knock-on effect on the Orb's movement.

To observe that effect, we just have to enter Stage 18 on the 地獄/Jigoku route, where it's particularly trivial to reproduce. At a 📝 horizontal velocity of ±4, these assignments are exactly what can cause the Orb to endlessly bounce between two bumpers. As rudimentary as the Orb's physics may be, just letting them do their work would have entirely prevented these loops:

The blue areas indicate the pixel-perfect* hitboxes of each bumper.

Now, you might be thinking that these Y assignments were just an attempt to prevent the Orb from colliding with the same bumper again on the next frame. After all, those 24 pixels exactly correspond to ⅓ of the height of a bumper's hitbox with an additional pixel added on top. However, the game already perfectly prevents repeated collisions by turning off collision testing with the same bumper for the next 7 frames after a collision. Thus, we can conclude that ZUN either explicitly coded bumper collision handling to facilitate these loops, or just didn't take out that code after inevitably discovering what it did. This is not janky code, it's not a glitch, it's not sarcasm from my end, and it's not the game's physics being bad.

But wait. Couldn't these assignments just be a remnant from a time in development before ZUN decided on the 7-frame delay on further collisions? Well, even that explanation stops holding water after the next few lines of code. Simplified, again:

pixel_t delta_x_between_orb_and_bumper = (orb.left - bumper.left);
if((orb.velocity.x == +4) && (delta_x_between_orb_and_bumper < 0)) {
	orb.velocity.x = -4;
} else if((orb.velocity.x == -4) && (delta_x_between_orb_and_bumper > 0)) {
	orb.velocity.x = +4;
}

What's important here is the part that's not in the code – namely, anything that handles X velocities of -8 or +8. In those cases, the Orb simply continues in the same horizontal direction. The manual Y assignment is the only part of the code that actually prevents a collision there, as the newly applied force is not guaranteed to be enough:

Forgetting to handle ⅖ of your discrete X velocity cases is simply not something you do by accident. So we might as well say that ZUN deliberately designed the game to behave exactly as it does in this regard.


Bumpers also come in vertical or horizontal bar shapes. Their collision handling also turns off further collision testing for the next 7 frames, and doesn't do any manual coordinate assignment. That's definitely a step up in cleanliness from round bumpers, but it doesn't seem to keep in mind that the player can fire a new shot every 4 frames when standing still. That makes it immediately obvious why this works:

The green numbers show the amount of frames since the last detected collision with the respective bumper bar, and indicate that collision testing with the bar below is currently disabled.

That's the most well-known case of reducing the Orb's horizontal velocity to 0 by exactly hitting it with shots in its center and then button-mashing it through a horizontal bar. This also works with vertical bars and yields even more interesting results there, but if we want to have any chance of understanding what happens there, we have to first go over some basics:

However, if that were everything the game did, kicking the Orb into a column of vertical bumper bars would lead them to behave more like a rope that the Orb can climb, as the initial collision with two hitboxes cancels out the intended sign change that reflects the Orb away from the bars:

This footage was recorded without the workaround I am about to describe. It does not reflect the behavior of the original game. You cannot do this in the original game.
While the visualization reveals small sections where three hitboxes overlap, the Orb can never actually collide with three of them at the same time, as those 3-hitbox regions are 2 pixels smaller than they would need to be to fit the Orb. That's exactly the difference between using < rather than <= in these hitbox comparisons.

While that would have been a fun gameplay mechanic on its own, it immediately breaks apart once you place two vertical bumper bars next to each other. Due to how these bumper bar hitboxes extend past their sprites, any two adjacent vertical bars will end up with the exact same hitbox in absolute screen coordinates. Stage 17 on the 魔界 /Makai route contains exactly such a layout:

The collision handlers of adjacent vertical bars always activate in the same frame, independently invert the Orb's X velocity, and therefore fully cancel out their intended effect on the Orb… if the game did not have the workaround I am about to describe. This cannot happen in the original game.

ZUN's workaround: Setting a "vertical bumper bar block flag" after any collision with such a bar, which simply disables any collision with any vertical bar for the next 7 frames. This quick hack made all vertical bars work as intended, and avoided the need for involving the Orb's X velocity in any kind of physics system. :zunpet:


Edit (2022-07-12): This flag only works around glitches that would be caused by simultaneously colliding with more than one vertical bar. The actual response to a bumper bar collision still remains unaffected, and is very naive:

These conditions are only correct if the Orb comes in at an angle roughly between 45° and 135° on either side of a bar. If it's anywhere close to 0° or 180°, this response will be incorrect, and send the Orb straight through the bar. Since the large hitboxes make this easily possible, you can still get the Orb to climb a vertical column, or glide along a horizontal row:

Here's the hitbox overlay for 地獄 /Jigoku Stage 19, and here's an updated version of the 📝 Orb physics debug mod that now also shows bumper bar collision frame numbers: 2022-07-10-TH01OrbPhysicsDebug.zip See the th01_orb_debug branch for the code. To use it, simply replace REIIDEN.EXE, and run the game in debug mode, via game d on the DOS prompt. If you encounter a gameplay situation that doesn't seem to be covered by this blog post, you can now verify it for yourself. Thanks to touhou-memories for bringing these issues to my attention! That definitely was a glaring omission from the initial version of this blog post.


With that clarified, we can now try mashing the Orb into these two vertical bars:

At first, that workaround doesn't seem to make a difference here. As we expect, the frame numbers now tell us that only one of the two bumper bars in a row activates, but we couldn't have told otherwise as the number of bars has no effect on newly applied Y velocity forces. On a closer look, the Orb's rise to the top of the playfield is in fact caused by that workaround though, combined with the unchanged top-to-bottom order of collision testing. As soon as any bumper bar completed its 7 collision delay frames, it resets the aforementioned flag, which already reactivates collision handling for any remaining vertical bumper bars during the same frame. Look out for frames with both a 7 and a 1: The 7 will always appear before the 1 in the row-major order. Whenever this happens, the current oscillation period is cut down from 7 to 6 frames – and because collision testing runs from top to bottom, this will always happen during the falling part. Depending on the Y velocity, the rising part may also be cut down to 6 frames from time to time, but that one at least has a chance to last for the full 7 frames. This difference adds those crucial extra frames of upward movement, which add up to send the Orb to the top. Without the flag, you'd always see the Orb oscillating between a fixed range of the bar column.
Finally, it's the "top of playfield" force that gradually slows down the Orb and makes sure it ultimately only moves at sub-pixel velocities, which have no visible effect. Because 📝 the regular effect of gravity is reset with each newly applied force, it's completely negated during most of the climb. This even holds true once the Orb reached the top: Since the Orb requires a negative force to repeatedly arrive up there and be bounced back, this force will stay active for the first 5 of the 7 collision frames and not move the Orb at all. Once gravity kicks in at the 5th frame and adds 1 to the Y velocity, it's already too late: The new velocity can't be larger than 0.5, and the Orb only has 1 or 2 frames before the flag reset causes it to be bounced back up to the top again.


Portals, on the other hand, turn out to be much simpler than the old description that ended up on Touhou Wiki in October 2005 might suggest. Everything about their teleportations is random: The destination portal, the exit force (as an integer between -9 and +9), as well as the exit X velocity, with each of the 📝 5 distinct horizontal velocities having an equal chance of being chosen. Of course, if the destination portal is next to the left or right edge of the playfield and it chooses to fire the Orb towards that edge, it immediately bounces off into the opposite direction, whereas the 0 velocity is always selected with a constant 20% probability.

The selection process for the destination portal involves a bit more than a single rand() call. The game bundles all obstacles in a single structure of dynamically allocated arrays, and only knows how many obstacles there are in total, not per type. Now, that alone wouldn't have much of an impact on random portal selection, as you could simply roll a random obstacle ID and try again if it's not a portal. But just to be extra cute, ZUN instead iterates over all obstacles, selects any non-entered portal with a chance of ¼, and just gives up if that dice roll wasn't successful after 16 loops over the whole array, defaulting to the entered portal in that case.
In all its silliness though, this works perfectly fine, and results in a chance of 0.7516(𝑛 - 1) for the Orb exiting out of the same portal it entered, with 𝑛 being the total number of portals in a stage. That's 1% for two portals, and 0.01% for three. Pretty decent for a random result you don't want to happen, but that hurts nobody if it does.

The one tiny ZUN bug with portals is technically not even part of the newly decompiled code here. If Reimu gets hit while the Orb is being sent through a portal, the Orb is immediately kicked out of the portal it entered, no matter whether it already shows up inside the sprite of the destination portal. Neither of the two portal sprites is reset when this happens, leading to "two Orbs" being visible simultaneously. :tannedcirno::onricdennat:
This makes very little sense no matter how you look at it. The Orb doesn't receive a new velocity or force when this happens, so it will simply re-enter the same portal once the gameplay resumes on Reimu's next life:

And that's it! At least the turrets don't have anything notable to say about them 📝 that I haven't said before.


That left another ½ of a push over at the end. Way too much time to finish FUUIN.exe, way too little time to start with Mima… but the bomb animation fit perfectly in there. No secrets or bugs there, just a bunch of sprite animation code wasting at least another 82 bytes in the data segment. The special effect after the kuji-in sprites uses the same single-bitplane 32×32 square inversion effect seen at the end of Kikuri's and Sariel's entrance animation, except that it's a 3-stack of 16-rings moving at 6, 7, and 8 pixels per frame respectively. At these comparatively slow speeds, the byte alignment of each square adds some further noise to the discoloration pattern… if you even notice it below all the shaking and seizure-inducing hardware palette manipulation.
And yes, due to the very destructive nature of the effect, the game does in fact rely on it only being applied to VRAM page 0. While that will cause every moving sprite to tear holes into the inverted squares along its trajectory, keeping a clean playfield on VRAM page 1 is what allows all that pixel damage to be easily undone at the end of this 89-frame animation.

Next up: Mima! Let's hope that stage obstacles already were the most complex part remaining in TH01…

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0162, P0163, P0164
Commits:
81dd96e...24b3a0d, 24b3a0d...6d572b3, 6d572b3...7a0e5d8
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528, Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ gameplay+ player+ shot- animation+ glitch+ waste+ jank+ unused+

No technical obstacles for once! Just pure overcomplicated ZUN code. Unlike 📝 Konngara's main function, the main TH01 player function was every bit as difficult to decompile as you would expect from its size.

With TH01 using both separate left- and right-facing sprites for all of Reimu's moves and separate classes for Reimu's 32×32 and 48×* sprites, we're already off to a bad start. Sure, sprite mirroring is minimally more involved on PC-98, as the planar nature of VRAM requires the bits within an 8-pixel byte to also be mirrored, in addition to writing the sprite bytes from right to left. TH03 uses a 256-byte lookup table for this, generated at runtime by an infamous micro-optimized and undecompilable ASM algorithm. With TH01's existing architecture, ZUN would have then needed to write 3 additional blitting functions. But instead, he chose to waste a total of 26,112 bytes of memory on pre-mirrored sprites… :godzun:

Alright, but surely selecting those sprites from code is no big deal? Just store the direction Reimu is facing in, and then add some branches to the rendering code. And there is in fact a variable for Reimu's direction… during regular arrow-key movement, and another one while shooting and sliding, and a third as part of the special attack types, launched out of a slide.
Well, OK, technically, the last two are the same variable. But that's even worse, because it means that ZUN stores two distinct enums at the same place in memory: Shooting and sliding uses 1 for left, 2 for right, and 3 for the "invalid" direction of holding both, while the special attack types indicate the direction in their lowest bit, with 0 for right and 1 for left. I decompiled the latter as bitflags, but in ZUN's code, each of the 8 permutations is handled as a distinct type, with copy-pasted and adapted code… :zunpet: The interpretation of this two-enum "sub-mode" union variable is controlled by yet another "mode" variable… and unsurprisingly, two of the bugs in this function relate to the sub-mode variable being interpreted incorrectly.

Also, "rendering code"? This one big function basically consists of separate unblit→update→render code snippets for every state and direction Reimu can be in (moving, shooting, swinging, sliding, special-attacking, and bombing), pasted together into a tangled mess of nested if(…) statements. While a lot of the code is copy-pasted, there are still a number of inconsistencies that defeat the point of my usual refactoring treatment. After all, with a total of 85 conditional branches, anything more than I did would have just obscured the control flow too badly, making it even harder to understand what's going on.
In the end, I spotted a total of 8 bugs in this function, all of which leave Reimu invisible for one or more frames:

Thanks to the last one, Reimu's first swing animation frame is never actually rendered. So whenever someone complains about TH01 sprite flickering on an emulator: That emulator is accurate, it's the game that's poorly written. :tannedcirno:

And guess what, this function doesn't even contain everything you'd associate with per-frame player behavior. While it does handle Yin-Yang Orb repulsion as part of slides and special attacks, it does not handle the actual player/Orb collision that results in lives being lost. The funny thing about this: These two things are done in the same function… :onricdennat:

Therefore, the life loss animation is also part of another function. This is where we find the final glitch in this 3-push series: Before the 16-frame shake, this function only unblits a 32×32 area around Reimu's center point, even though it's possible to lose a life during the non-deflecting part of a 48×48-pixel animation. In that case, the extra pixels will just stay on screen during the shake. They are unblitted afterwards though, which suggests that ZUN was at least somewhat aware of the issue?
Finally, the chance to see the alternate life loss sprite Alternate TH01 life loss sprite is exactly ⅛.


As for any new insights into game mechanics… you know what? I'm just not going to write anything, and leave you with this flowchart instead. Here's the definitive guide on how to control Reimu in TH01 we've been waiting for 24 years:

(SVG download)

Pellets are deflected during all gray states. Not shown is the obvious "double-tap Z and X" transition from all non-(#1) states to the Bomb state, but that would have made this diagram even more unwieldy than it turned out. And yes, you can shoot twice as fast while moving left or right.

While I'm at it, here are two more animations from MIKO.PTN which aren't referenced by any code:

An unused animation from TH01's MIKO.PTNAn unused animation from TH01's MIKO.PTN

With that monster of a function taken care of, we've only got boss sprite animation as the final blocker of uninterrupted Sariel progress. Due to some unfavorable code layout in the Mima segment though, I'll need to spend a bit more time with some of the features used there. Next up: The missile bullets used in the Mima and YuugenMagan fights.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0096, P0097, P0098
Commits:
8ddb778...8283c5e, 8283c5e...600f036, 600f036...ad06748
💰 Funded by:
Ember2528, Yanga
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th01+ file-format+ pc98+ blitting+ gameplay+ player+ shot- jank+ mod+ tcc+

So, let's finally look at some TH01 gameplay structures! The obvious choices here are player shots and pellets, which are conveniently located in the last code segment. Covering these would therefore also help in transferring some first bits of data in REIIDEN.EXE from ASM land to C land. (Splitting the data segment would still be quite annoying.) Player shots are immediately at the beginning…

…but wait, these are drawn as transparent sprites loaded from .PTN files. Guess we first have to spend a push on 📝 Part 2 of this format.
Hm, 4 functions for alpha-masked blitting and unblitting of both 16×16 and 32×32 .PTN sprites that align the X coordinate to a multiple of 8 (remember, the PC-98 uses a planar VRAM memory layout, where 8 pixels correspond to a byte), but only one function that supports unaligned blitting to any X coordinate, and only for 16×16 sprites? Which is only called twice? And doesn't come with a corresponding unblitting function? :thonk:

Yeah, "unblitting". TH01 isn't double-buffered, and uses the PC-98's second VRAM page exclusively to store a stage's background and static sprites. Since the PC-98 has no hardware sprites, all you can do is write pixels into VRAM, and any animated sprite needs to be manually removed from VRAM at the beginning of each frame. Not using double-buffering theoretically allows TH01 to simply copy back all 128 KB of VRAM once per frame to do this. :tannedcirno: But that would be pretty wasteful, so TH01 just looks at all animated sprites, and selectively copies only their occupied pixels from the second to the first VRAM page.


Alright, player shot class methods… oh, wait, the collision functions directly act on the Yin-Yang Orb, so we first have to spend a push on that one. And that's where the impression we got from the .PTN functions is confirmed: The orb is, in fact, only ever displayed at byte-aligned X coordinates, divisible by 8. It's only thanks to the constant spinning that its movement appears at least somewhat smooth.
This is purely a rendering issue; internally, its position is tracked at pixel precision. Sadly, smooth orb rendering at any unaligned X coordinate wouldn't be that trivial of a mod, because well, the necessary functions for unaligned blitting and unblitting of 32×32 sprites don't exist in TH01's code. Then again, there's so much potential for optimization in this code, so it might be very possible to squeeze those additional two functions into the same C++ translation unit, even without position independence…

More importantly though, this was the right time to decompile the core functions controlling the orb physics – probably the highlight in these three pushes for most people.
Well, "physics". The X velocity is restricted to the 5 discrete states of -8, -4, 0, 4, and 8, and gravity is applied by simply adding 1 to the Y velocity every 5 frames :zunpet: No wonder that this can easily lead to situations in which the orb infinitely bounces from the ground.
At least fangame authors now have a reference of how ZUN did it originally, because really, this bad approximation of physics had to have been written that way on purpose. But hey, it uses 64-bit floating-point variables! :onricdennat:

…sometimes at least, and quite randomly. This was also where I had to learn about Turbo C++'s floating-point code generation, and how rigorously it defines the order of instructions when mixing double and float variables in arithmetic or conditional expressions. This meant that I could only get ZUN's original instruction order by using literal constants instead of variables, which is impossible right now without somehow splitting the data segment. In the end, I had to resort to spelling out ⅔ of one function, and one conditional branch of another, in inline ASM. 😕 If ZUN had just written 16.0 instead of 16.0f there, I would have saved quite some hours of my life trying to decompile this correctly…

To sort of make up for the slowdown in progress, here's the TH01 orb physics debug mod I made to properly understand them. Edit (2022-07-12): This mod is outdated, 📝 the current version is here! 2020-06-13-TH01OrbPhysicsDebug.zip To use it, simply replace REIIDEN.EXE, and run the game in debug mode, via game d on the DOS prompt.
Its code might also serve as an example of how to achieve this sort of thing without position independence.

Screenshot of the TH01 orb physics debug mod

Alright, now it's time for player shots though. Yeah, sure, they don't move horizontally, so it's not too bad that those are also always rendered at byte-aligned positions. But, uh… why does this code only use the 16×16 alpha-masked unblitting function for decaying shots, and just sloppily unblits an entire 16×16 square everywhere else?

The worst part though: Unblitting, moving, and rendering player shots is done in a single function, in that order. And that's exactly where TH01's sprite flickering comes from. Since different types of sprites are free to overlap each other, you'd have to first unblit all types, then move all types, and then render all types, as done in later PC-98 Touhou games. If you do these three steps per-type instead, you will unblit sprites of other types that have been rendered before… and therefore end up with flicker.
Oh, and finally, ZUN also added an additional sloppy 16×16 square unblit call if a shot collides with a pellet or a boss, for some guaranteed flicker. Sigh.


And that's ⅓ of all ZUN code in TH01 decompiled! Next up: Pellets!

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0062
Commits:
1d6fbb8...f275e04
💰 Funded by:
Touhou Patch Center
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ player+ shot- position-independence+ animation+

Big gains, as expected, but not much to say about this one. With TH05 Reimu being way too easy to decompile after 📝 the shot control groundwork done in October, there was enough time to give the comprehensive PI false-positive treatment to two other sets of functions present in TH04's and TH05's OP.EXE. One of them, master.lib's super_*() functions, was used a lot in TH02, more than in any other game… I wonder how much more that game will progress without even focusing on it in particular.

Alright then! 100% PI for TH04's and TH05's OP.EXE upcoming… (Edit: Already got funding to cover this!)

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0061
Commits:
96684f4...5f4f5d8
💰 Funded by:
Touhou Patch Center
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th03+ gameplay+ player+ shot- animation+

… nope, with a game whose MAIN.EXE is still just 5% reverse-engineered and which naturally makes heavy use of structures, there's still a lot more PI groundwork to be done before RE progress can speed up to the levels that we've now reached with TH05. The good news is that this game is (now) way easier to understand: In contrast to TH04 and TH05, where we needed to work towards player shots over a two-digit number of pushes, TH03 only needed two for SPRITE16, and a half one for the playfield shaking mechanism. After that, I could even already decompile the per-frame shot update and render functions, thanks to TH03's high number of code segments. Now, even the big 128-byte player structure doesn't seem all too far off.

Then again, as TH03 shares no code with any other game, this actually was a completely average PI push. For the remaining three, we'll return to TH04 and TH05 though, which should more than make up for the slight drop in RE speed after this one.

In other news, we've now also reached peak C++, with the introduction of templates! TH03 stores movement speeds in a 4.4 fixed-point format, which is an 8-bit spin on the usual 16-bit, 12.4 fixed-point format.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0036, P0037
Commits:
a533b5d...82b0e1d, 82b0e1d...e7e1cbc
💰 Funded by:
zorg
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ player+ shot- tcc+

And just in time for zorg's last outstanding pushes, the TH05 shot type control functions made the speedup happen!

It would have been really nice to also include Reimu's shot control functions in this last push, but figuring out this entire system, with its weird bitflags and switch statement micro-optimizations, was once again taking way longer than it should have. Especially with my new-found insistence on turning this obvious copy-pasta into something somewhat readable and terse…

But with such a rather tabular visual structure, things should now be moddable in hopefully easily consistent way. Of course, since we're only at 54% position independence for MAIN.EXE, this isn't possible yet without crashing the game, but modifiying damage would already work.

Despite my earlier claims of ZUN only having used C++ in TH01, as it's the only game using new and delete, it's now pretty much confirmed that ZUN used it for all games, as inlined functions (and by extension, C++ class methods) are the only way to get certain instructions out of the Turbo C++ code generator. Also, I've kept my promise and started really filling that decompilation pattern file.

And now, with the reverse-engineering backlog finally being cleared out, we wait for the next orders, and the direction they might focus on…

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0047, P0048
Commits:
9a2c6f7...893bd46
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ player+ shot- animation+ waste+

So, let's continue with player shots! …eh, or maybe not directly, since they involve two other structure types in TH05, which we'd have to cover first. One of them is a different sort of sprite, and since I like me some context in my reverse-engineering, let's disable every other sprite type first to figure out what it is.

One of those other sprite types were the little sparks flying away from killed stage enemies, midbosses, and grazed bullets; easy enough to also RE right now. Turns out they use the same 8 hardcoded 8×8 sprites in TH02, TH04, and TH05. Except that it's actually 64 16×8 sprites, because ZUN wanted to pre-shift them for all 8 possible start pixels within a planar VRAM byte (rather than, like, just writing a few instructions to shift them programmatically), leading to them taking up 1,024 bytes rather than just 64.
Oh, and the thing I wanted to RE *actually* was the decay animation whenever a shot hits something. Not too complex either, especially since it's exclusive to TH05.

And since there was some time left and I actually have to pick some of the next RE places strategically to best prepare for the upcoming 17 decompilation pushes, here's two more function pointers for good measure.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0046
Commits:
612beb8...deb45ea
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th04+ th05+ micro-optimization+ gameplay+ player+ shot-

Stumbled across one more drawing function in the way… which was only a duplicated and seemingly pointlessly micro-optimized copy of master.lib's super_roll_put_tiny() function, used for fast display of 4-color 16×16 sprites.

With this out of the way, we can tackle player shot sprite animation next. This will get rid of a lot of code, since every power level of every character's shot type is implemented in its own function. Which makes up thousands of instructions in both TH04 and TH05 that we can nicely decompile in the future without going through a dedicated reverse-engineering step.

📝 Posted:
🚚 Summary of:
P0008
Commits:
47e5601...d62dd06
💰 Funded by:
-Tom-
🏷 Tags:
rec98+ th02+ th04+ th05+ gameplay+ player+ shot-

You could use this to get a homing Mima, for example.