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Whew, TH01's boss code just had to end with another beast of a boss, taking way longer than it should have and leaving uncomfortably little time for the rest of the game. Let's get right into the overview of YuugenMagan, the most sequential and scripted battle in this game:


At a pixel-perfect 81×61 pixels, the Orb hitboxes are laid out rather generously this time, reaching quite a bit outside the 64×48 eye sprites:

TH01 YuugenMagan's hitboxes.

And that's about the only positive thing I can say about a position calculation in this fight. Phase 0 already starts with the lasers being off by 1 pixel from the center of the iris. Sure, 28 may be a nicer number to add than 29, but the result won't be byte-aligned either way? This is followed by the eastern laser's hitbox somehow being 24 pixels larger than the others, stretching a rather unexpected 70 pixels compared to the 46 of every other laser.
On a more hilarious note, the eye closing keyframe contains the following (pseudo-)code, comprising the only real accidentally "unused" danmaku subpattern in TH01:

// Did you mean ">= RANK_HARD"?
if(rank == RANK_HARD) {
	eye_north.fire_aimed_wide_5_spread();
	eye_southeast.fire_aimed_wide_5_spread();
	eye_southwest.fire_aimed_wide_5_spread();

	// Because this condition can never be true otherwise.
	// As a result, no pellets will be spawned on Lunatic mode.
	// (There is another Lunatic-exclusive subpattern later, though.)
	if(rank == RANK_LUNATIC) {
		eye_west.fire_aimed_wide_5_spread();
		eye_east.fire_aimed_wide_5_spread();
	}
}

Featuring the weirdly extended hitbox for the eastern laser, as well as an initial Reimu position that points out the disparity between byte-aligned rendering and the internal coordinates one final time.

After a few utility functions that look more like a quickly abandoned refactoring attempt, we quickly get to the main attraction: YuugenMagan combines the entire boss script and most of the pattern code into a single 2,634-instruction function, totaling 9,677 bytes inside REIIDEN.EXE. For comparison, ReC98's version of this code consists of at least 49 functions, excluding those I had to add to work around ZUN's little inconsistencies, or the ones I added for stylistic reasons.
In fact, this function is so large that Turbo C++ 4.0J refuses to generate assembly output for it via the -S command-line option, aborting with a Compiler table limit exceeded in function error. Contrary to what the Borland C++ 4.0 User Guide suggests, this instance of the error is not at all related to the number of function bodies or any metric of algorithmic complexity, but is simply a result of the compiler's internal text representation for a single function overflowing a 64 KiB memory segment. Merely shortening the names of enough identifiers within the function can help to get that representation down below 64 KiB. If you encounter this error during regular software development, you might interpret it as the compiler's roundabout way of telling you that it inlined way more function calls than you probably wanted to have inlined. Because you definitely won't explicitly spell out such a long function in newly-written code, right? :tannedcirno:
At least it wasn't the worst copy-pasting job in this game; that trophy still goes to 📝 Elis. And while the tracking code for adjusting an eye's sprite according to the player's relative position is one of the main causes behind all the bloat, it's also 100% consistent, and might have been an inlined class method in ZUN's original code as well.

The clear highlight in this fight though? Almost no coordinate is precisely calculated where you'd expect it to be. In particular, all bullet spawn positions completely ignore the direction the eyes are facing to:

Pellets unexpectedly spawned at the exact
	bottom center of an eye
Combining the bottom of the pupil with the exact horizontal center of the sprite as a whole might sound like a good idea, but looks especially wrong if the eye is facing right.
Missile spawn positions in the TH01
	YuugenMagan fight
Here it's the other way round: OK for a right-facing eye, really wrong for a left-facing one.
Spawn position of the 3-pixel laser in the
	TH01 YuugenMagan fight
Dude, the eye is even supposed to track the laser in this one!
The final center position of the regular
	pentagram in the TH01 YuugenMagan fight
Hint: That's not the center of the playfield. At least the pellets spawned from the corners are sort of correct, but with the corner calculates precomputed, you could only get them wrong on purpose.

Due to their effect on gameplay, these inaccuracies can't even be called "bugs", and made me devise a new "quirk" category instead. More on that in the TH01 100% blog post, though.


While we did see an accidentally unused bullet pattern earlier, I can now say with certainty that there are no truly unused danmaku patterns in TH01, i.e., pattern code that exists but is never called. However, the code for YuugenMagan's phase 5 reveals another small piece of danmaku design intention that never shows up within the parameters of the original game.
By default, pellets are clipped when they fly past the top of the playfield, which we can clearly observe for the first few pellets of this pattern. Interestingly though, the second subpattern actually configures its pellets to fall straight down from the top of the playfield instead. You never see this happening in-game because ZUN limited that subpattern to a downwards angle range of 0x73 or 162°, resulting in none of its pellets ever getting close to the top of the playfield. If we extend that range to a full 360° though, we can see how ZUN might have originally planned the pattern to end:

YuugenMagan's phase 5 patterns on every difficulty, with the second subpattern extended to reveal the different pellet behavior that remained in the final game code. In the original game, the eyes would stop spawning bullets on the marked frame.

If we also disregard everything else about YuugenMagan that fits the upcoming definition of quirk, we're left with 6 "fixable" bugs, all of which are a symptom of general blitting and unblitting laziness. Funnily enough, they can all be demonstrated within a short 9-second part of the fight, from the end of phase 9 up until the pentagram starts spinning in phase 13:

  1. General flickering whenever any sprite overlaps an eye. This is caused by only reblitting each eye every 3 frames, and is an issue all throughout the fight. You might have already spotted it in the videos above.
  2. Each of the two lasers is unblitted and blitted individually instead of each operation being done for both lasers together. Remember how 📝 ZUN unblits 32 horizontal pixels for every row of a line regardless of its width? That's why the top part of the left, right-moving laser is never visible, because it's blitted before the other laser is unblitted.
  3. ZUN forgot to unblit the lasers when phase 9 ends. This footage was recorded by pressing ↵ Return in test mode (game t or game d), and it's probably impossible to achieve this during actual gameplay without TAS techniques. You would have to deal the required 6 points of damage within 491 frames, with the eye being invincible during 240 of them. Simply shooting up an Orb with a horizontal velocity of 0 would also only work a single time, as boss entities always repel the Orb with a horizontal velocity of ±4.
  4. The shrinking pentagram is unblitted after the eyes were blitted, adding another guaranteed frame of flicker on top of the ones in 1). Like in 2), the blockiness of the holes is another result of unblitting 32 pixels per row at a time.
  5. Another missing unblitting call in a phase transition, as the pentagram switches from its not quite correctly interpolated shrunk form to a regular star polygon with a radius of 64 pixels. Indirectly caused by the massively bloated coordinate calculation for the shrink animation being done separately for the unblitting and blitting calls. Instead of, y'know, just doing it once and storing the result in variables that can later be reused.
  6. The pentagram is not reblitted at all during the first 100 frames of phase 13. During that rather long time, it's easily possible to remove it from VRAM completely by covering its area with player shots. Or HARRY UP pellets.

Definitely an appropriate end for this game's entity blitting code. :onricdennat: I'm really looking forward to writing a proper sprite system for the Anniversary Edition…

And just in case you were wondering about the hitboxes of these pentagrams as they slam themselves into Reimu:

62 pixels on the X axis, centered around each corner point of the star, 16 pixels below, and extending infinitely far up. The latter part becomes especially devious because the game always collision-detects all 5 corners, regardless of whether they've already clipped through the bottom of the playfield. The simultaneously occurring shape distortions are simply a result of the line drawing function's rather poor re-interpolation of any line that runs past the 640×400 VRAM boundaries; 📝 I described that in detail back when I debugged the shootout laser crash. Ironically, using fixed-size hitboxes for a variable-sized pentagram means that the larger one is easier to dodge.


The final puzzle in TH01's boss code comes 📝 once again in the form of weird hardware palette changes. The 邪 kanji on the background image goes through various colors throughout the fight, which ZUN implemented by gradually incrementing and decrementing either a single one or none of the color's three 4-bit components at the beginning of each even-numbered phase. The resulting color sequence, however, doesn't quite seem to follow these simple rules:

Adding some debug output sheds light on what's going on there:

Since each iteration of phase 12 adds 63 to the red component, integer overflow will cause the color to infinitely alternate between dark-blue and red colors on every 2.03 iterations of the pentagram phase loop. The 65th iteration will therefore be the first one with a dark-blue color for a third iteration in a row – just in case you manage to stall the fight for that long.

Yup, ZUN had so much trust in the color clamping done by his hardware palette functions that he did not clamp the increment operation on the stage_palette itself. :zunpet: Therefore, the 邪 colors and even the timing of their changes from Phase 6 onwards are "defined" by wildly incrementing color components beyond their intended domain, so much that even the underlying signed 8-bit integer ends up overflowing. Given that the decrement operation on the stage_palette is clamped though, this might be another one of those accidents that ZUN deliberately left in the game, 📝 similar to the conclusion I reached with infinite bumper loops.
But guess what, that's also the last time we're going to encounter this type of palette component domain quirk! Later games use master.lib's 8-bit palette system, which keeps the comfort of using a single byte per component, but shifts the actual hardware color into the top 4 bits, leaving the bottom 4 bits for added precision during fades.

OK, but now we're done with TH01's bosses! 🎉That was the 8th PC-98 Touhou boss in total, leaving 23 to go.


With all the necessary research into these quirks going well into a fifth push, I spent the remaining time in that one with transferring most of the data between YuugenMagan and the upcoming rest of REIIDEN.EXE into C land. This included the one piece of technical debt in TH01 we've been carrying around since March 2015, as well as the final piece of the ending sequence in FUUIN.EXE. Decompiling that executable's main() function in a meaningful way requires pretty much all remaining data from REIIDEN.EXE to also be moved into C land, just in case you were wondering why we're stuck at 99.46% there.
On a more disappointing note, the static initialization code for the 📝 5 boss entity slots ultimately revealed why YuugenMagan's code is as bloated and redundant as it is: The 5 slots really are 5 distinct variables rather than a single 5-element array. That's why ZUN explicitly spells out all 5 eyes every time, because the array he could have just looped over simply didn't exist. 😕 And while these slot variables are stored in a contiguous area of memory that I could just have taken the address of and then indexed it as if it were an array, I didn't want to annoy future port authors with what would technically be out-of-bounds array accesses for purely stylistic reasons. At least it wasn't that big of a deal to rewrite all boss code to use these distinct variables, although I certainly had to get a bit creative with Elis.

Next up: Finding out how many points we got in totle, and hoping that ZUN didn't hide more unexpected complexities in the remaining 45 functions of this game. If you have to spare, there are two ways in which that amount of money would help right now: